• In the upcoming Linux 4.14-rc3 release, work continues to develop the Kselftest TAP13 framework API and convert tests to TAP13. The new tests include Kselftest common RUN_TESTS in lib.mk that have been enhanced to print TAP13 to cover test shell scripts that won’t be able to use the Kselftest TAP13 API; this also covers test programs that aren’t converted yet. Several fixes have been made to existing tests to prevent failure in unsupported cases as part of an ongoing work based on feedback from Kselftest stable release users that don’t want the tests to fail due to unmet dependencies, such as config options being disabled. Additionally, a new watchdog test has been added and much needed cleanups to the existing watchdog tests have been made by Eugeniu Rosca. A New Kselftest Use-Case A notable change in this release is new support for the “make O=dir kselftest” use-case.  Several developers rely on this […]

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  • October 5, 2017 - Mike Blumenkrantz

    How to Create an EFL Gadget Sandbox

    The new gadget API and infrastructure for Enlightenment continue to undergo heavy development. In addition to improving and extending the base gadget UI, work has recently begun on creating a gadget provider with the new API to provide sandboxing and allow gadgets to be written as regular applications that don’t have or require access to compositor internals. The primary enabler of the new sandboxing system is the efl-wl compositor widget. This allows the compositor to launch applications in isolation, and also provides the ability to add protocol extensions for only that specific instance of the compositor widget. Using these features, it becomes possible to add gadget-specific protocols and utilities on the compositor side that are passed through transparently to the client gadget application. Currently, there is one base protocol in use: the e-gadget protocol, which looks like this:

    The purpose of this is to mimic the gadget API. Applications […]

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  • August 2, 2017 - Bryce Harrington

    Better Attachment Handling with Mutt

    The Mutt email client is famed for its extensive configuration options, but since it’s text-based, certain things are more challenging to do when compared to its graphical brethren. Viewing attachments is one such annoyance; fortunately, as with most things, Mutt is extensively configurable! By default, Mutt does fine with most plain text documents, and depending on your installation may also handle HTML documents in some fashion. Attachments that Mutt doesn’t recognize can of course be downloaded and viewed manually, but we can do better. To tell Mutt that it should handle a new attachment type, or its “MIME type”, we associate it with Mutt’s “auto_view” parameter. For example, add this to your ~/.muttrc (and restart Mutt):

    Note: if you plan to add a number of file types, you may wish to put these in their own config file (e.g. ~/.mutt/auto-views), and include a line in ~/.muttrc like the following: […]

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  • July 28, 2017 - Shuah Khan

    Kselftest for Linux 4.13 to Include TAP13

    Linux 4.13-rc1 was released on July 15th 2017  and it includes enhancements to the Kselftest framework to support The Test Anything Protocol v13 (TAP13). TAP13 defines a human friendly output format for tests. Kselftest is run in test rings and is widely used for Linux kernel stable release regression testing. It’s important to make it easier to identify run-to-run differences; TAP13 adaption makes it easier to understand the test results, and helps pin point differences between one run to another run of the test suite. Credit goes to Tim Bird for recommending TAP13 as a suitable format, and to Greg KH for kick starting the work with help from Paul Elder and Alice Ferrazzi. The first phase of the TAP13 conversion is included in Linux 4.13. Future releases will include updates to rest of the tests. The following shows membarrier test results before and after TAP 13 conversion: Before:

    After: […]

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  • The X.org Foundation is a non-profit governance entity charged with overseeing core components of the open source graphics community. X.org had been structured as a legal (non-profit) corporate entity registered in the state of Delaware for some years, which provided tax deduction on donations and other such benefits. Unfortunately, being a non-profit is not cheap and entails various administrative tasks – filing annual reports, maintaining a bank account, dealing with donations and expenses, and so on – so the overhead of being an independent non-profit was deemed not worth the benefits, and in 2016 the members voted to join Software in the Public Interest (SPI). Joining SPI made a lot of sense; primarily, it would relieve X.org of administrative burdens while preserving the benefits of non-profit status. The costs of being in SPI are offset by the savings of not having to pay the various fees required to upkeep the […]

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  • July 18, 2017 - Bryce Harrington

    Introduction to GPG Encryption and git-crypt

    While Open Source prides itself on open transparency, there are certain things that must be kept secret like team credentials or personal information.  GNU’s OpenPGP (GPG) encryption tool set coupled with git-crypt can be invaluable for sharing such information privately with colleagues. For people unfamiliar with GPG it can seem a bit intimidating to start with, but it needn’t be! This article is a step-by-step introduction to getting set up with your own GPG key. Install GPG Since GPG has become pretty ubiquitous it should be straightforward to install via the usual method for your operating system. debian/ubuntu:

    OSX (using ports):

    etc. Create Your Own GPG Key Easy enough! The following command will ask for the info needed to make the key. Pick RSA with a key length of 4096 bits, and be very careful to set a unique GPG password that you’re not using anywhere else (but pick one you can remember!):

    […]

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  • July 13, 2017 - Thibault Saunier

    GStreamer to Gain the First RTSP 2.0 Implementation!

    Real Time Stream Protocol 2.0 The RTSP 2.0 was proposed in December 2016 to replace the 1.0 version of the standard; this new version is not backward compatible with the previous one. RTSP 1.0 is almost 20 years old, and it’s done a good job at defining a standard protocol for real time media streaming signaling, but it has not evolved much since then and had some issues that were worth fixing. The new version of this standard aims to resolve inconsistencies, clean up the RFC, add missing definitions, and restructure the document to reach better interoperability between implementers. RTSP 2.0 also comes with a bunch of new features (such as pipelined setup request, to avoid round trip time on initialization) and removes some features that were considered not useful enough (such as the RECORD command). GStreamer’s RSTP 2.0 Implementation At Samsung, we decided it was the right time to […]

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  • The gst-validate utility allows for the detection of known issues in GStreamer pipelines, and it’s part of the developer tools the GStreamer community offers through the gst-devtols modules. In this guide, I will demonstrate how to create playback scenarios to test a pipeline’s reaction to a new set of controlling actions. There are a couple of common and not-so-common scenarios that are already included with the GStreamer validate suite. This set allows for the identification of known error conditions on a running pipeline subjected to the actions the provided scenarios express. Now, what if you want to inspect the reaction of your pipeline to a new set of actions? Then, you need a new scenario that describes it. What’s in a Scenario? Scenarios are built from serialized actions on a .scenario file. These actions and their parameters are expressed using a GstStructure-based text format, and includes the following core actions: […]

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  • As you might already know, many open source projects are moving away from autotools as a build system and are embracing Meson. GStreamer was one of the first projects to initiate this move as the community pushed for it to happen. Meson has many advantages over autotools, but one I would like to talk about in this post is the notion of subprojects, which Meson introduces. Basically, thanks to this it’s easy to build several projects as if it was one; GStreamer has many components that were formerly independent in the build system, meaning that if you wanted to build the latest version of, say, gst-plugins-bad, you also needed to build GStreamer core and GStreamer base one way or another. Previously, we had some scripts to help with this process, but it was still necessary to clone and build everything separately and handle interdependency between things manually. Today, things are different when using […]

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  • June 13, 2017 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    The Business Value of Open Source Software

    This article is part of the comprehensive guide to open source for business. The previous article in this series covered the technical reasons for why OSS is often better than proprietary software. This article will explore how OSS can benefit a business from a non-technical perspective. Open Source Development Reduces Costs One of the major reasons more companies are adopting OSS is because it is a very effective way to reduce development costs. The two primary ways open source reduces development costs is by simplifying software licensing and increasing development speed. Simplifies Licensing Initially, the most obvious place OSS reduces costs is through the complete lack of licensing costs. Proprietary software typically includes initial licensing costs and ongoing maintenance contracts that can be a significant portion of the initial costs; these are often unavoidable. OSS licenses grant free use, modification, and distribution rights to everyone, meaning there is no initial […]

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