Brian Warner

Brian Warner

About Brian Warner

Brian is Director of Open Source Engineering and Strategy in the Samsung Open Source Group.

  • Role

    Director, Open Source Engineering and Strategy

Posts by Brian Warner

  • You probably saw the announcement on October 10, 2016 that the Open Connectivity Foundation and the AllSeen Alliance will merge and create a ‘best of both’ IoT framework. To recap briefly, the Board of Directors from both organizations have agreed to consolidate operations under the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), while the open source projects will continue to be hosted at the Linux Foundation. I’ve noticed some confusion about what exactly happened, so I thought I would clarify some things in this article. To start, OCF and the AllSeen Alliance are each non-profit entities that are responsible for the business operations of each project. In addition, OCF hosts development of the specification. Each organization has their own bylaws, membership agreement, IPR policy, and charter. By law they must be governed by a board of directors, which consists of representatives from member organizations. One of the major differences between the two is that […]

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  • Consistency is everything. If launching open source projects is part of your job, it is incredibly helpful to have a clear, consistent, and repeatable process for open sourcing code and building a project. Why? There are a few reasons. For one, it increases your odds of success if you can identify the parts of the process that worked well before, and repeat them. Project launches are about people as much as technology. There are actions that attract others, and actions that drive others away; it’s beneficial to remember which is which. If you can’t convince others to join and use your project, you may as well just post the code and be done with it. Another major reason is time. I seriously doubt I’m alone in observing that the typical “We’re launching an OSS project next month! Um, where do we start?” emails usually come with little warning. Most of the time […]

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  • February 17, 2016 - Brian Warner

    Contribute Upstream to Manage Technical Debt

    One of the things that you’ll find in the world of corporate open source is that we tend to talk a lot about money. This makes sense of course, since open source has had a significant and lasting financial impact on the economics of software development. At the same time it also provides a useful metaphor for why we do what we do. These days, the Leveraged Development Model is pretty well understood: We all put a bit of development into a project, and in return we get to reap benefits far greater than the value of our own contribution. This dynamic is the main driver behind the saying, “Software is eating the world, and open source is eating software.” At this point, it’s virtually impossible to deliver a software product on time and within budget without open source; this is all the more true when your competitors are actively […]

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  • One of the great things about being in the Open Source Group at Samsung is that we get to work on cool stuff both inside and outside the company. As we’ve done in past years, Samsung is sponsoring a project in Jay Borenstein’s CS210 course at Stanford. The objective of CS210 is to expose students to corporate development practices by giving them real world design and development projects, pushing the envelope of technology and building something cool. Companies like Samsung can sponsor project teams by providing the building blocks for a project and mentoring students through the process. Smart Watch, Smart Home We are calling our project for 2016 Smart Watch, Smart Home. As you can probably guess, it will involve wearables and home automation; of course, it will involve open source. Home Automation Home automation products are nothing new and have been around for many years. However, recently there’s […]

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  • This is  the 2nd and final part of a series on measuring the value of open source developers. Part 1 can be found here. It’s been almost three years since the Open Source Group was established at Samsung. In that time we’ve grown quite a bit. Now that we’ve had some time to get our feet on the ground we’ve decided to take a look back at our impact. Why do We Need an Open Source Group Anyways? Samsung is on a multi-year journey to become both a better consumer of open source, and a better contributor and leader in the projects that end up in our products. The reasons for doing so are quite clear to us: while it’s easy to use code that’s made freely available, it’s risky and potentially quite expensive to rely upon it long-term, unless you are proactively working within the community. The reason it’s […]

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  • This is part 1 of a series on the value of an open source software development group for companies that rely on open source technology. If you’ve worked in a corporate development environment, you certainly understand that metrics are everything. If you’re doing development, you are probably familiar with the feeling that metrics aren’t perfect. I can’t count how many times I’ve heard, “Well, I’m measured on X because it generates a number, but let me tell you the real story…” Certain things are both meaningful and easy to measure such as the number of conference talks accepted and presented, internal training sessions delivered, or other employees that are mentored. But what do you do about code? What Does it Mean to Measure the Value of Your Open Source Contributors? As hard as it is to measure an individual developer’s code contributions using a standardized set of statistics, it can […]

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  • I’ve been at Samsung in the Open Source Group as Senior Open Source Strategist for about three months now, and one of the most exciting parts of my job is to help internal groups prepare to spin up new open source projects. This is something that I particularly enjoy, having spent five years at The Linux Foundation doing pretty much the same thing (albeit seated in a different place at the table). So You Think You Can Open Source? One of the things I’ve noticed over the past few years is that it’s really easy and exciting for people to say, “Open source is hot! Let’s create a new project, do some open source-y stuff, and change the world! And let’s tell the boss we’re doing this right away!” In some cases (including a few I’m working on right now) this genuinely is the case. Truly transformative technologies tend to […]

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  • August 12, 2015 - Javier Martinez Canillas and Brian Warner

    The Samsung OSG Keeps Growing.

    The Samsung Open Source Group consists of only about 50 people spread out over the entire world, and in an organization that employs more than 275,000 it can be a challenge for us to make a large impact on the company as a whole. In order to do this, its vital we hire individuals that play key roles in the open source ecosystem  so that we can continue to integrate greater adoption of open source methodology into the company at large. With that said, it’s a pleasure to introduce our two newest members Javier Martinez Canillas, and Brian Warner. Javier Martinez Canillas I’m very happy to announce I’ve joined the Samsung Open Source Group. As people that have been following the Linux Exynos upstream development probably know, I’ve been working on improving the mainline support for the Samsung Exynos5 based Chromebooks and Exynos5 in general over the last year. Now, […]

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  • August 10, 2015 - Brian Warner

    Tizen Has Serious Momentum in India

    I was fortunate enough to attend the third Tizen Developer Summit, hosted this year in Bengaluru, India. What a great experience! As you might be aware, I recently joined Samsung from the Linux Foundation (more on this in the future), where I was the manager of the Tizen project. I’ve been involved in every Tizen event since the beginning, but there was something special about this one that felt like a milestone had been passed, and it wasen’t just because of the million Samsung Z1 smartphones that have been sold since launch. People are Flocking to Tizen I wasn’t surprised simply by the size of the event; there were more than one thousand attendees at what’s typically Tizen’s smaller event every year. Nor was I surprised by the 500 plus people that signed up for the Tizen DevLab, 2.5 times more people than we had seats for. Although it is […]

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