Mario Smarduch

Mario Smarduch

About Mario Smarduch

Mario Smarduch is no longer employed by Samsung. We thank him for all of his great work and wish him the best in his future endeavors. Mario Smarduch was a Senior Virtualization Architect at the Samsung Open Source Group in Silicon Valley. His primary areas of expertise are ETSI, ISG, NFV, and KVM-ARM virtualization extensions, real-time, zero copy, inter-guest communication, and optimized device passthrough. He's been involved with Linux Kernel for past 15 years and virtualization for the last 5. He has worked mostly on the product side, but also interacts on and off with open source communities as needed. In the past Mario has worked for Huawei Technologies, Motorola Mobility/Solutions, Compaq, Tandem, Qualix/EMC, Sun Microsystems, Integrated Micro Products, and AT&T Bell Labs.

  • Projects

    KVM, QEMU, Kernel, Libvirt
  • Role

    Senior Virtualization Architect

Posts by Mario Smarduch

  • November 30, 2015 - Mario Smarduch

    An Introduction to Live Migration in NFV Deployment

    This article is the first of two on live migration in NFV Deployment. Live migration is a generic feature that is important in all cloud environments including Network Functions Virtualization (NFV) applications. This post covers likely NFV use cases for live migration, the type of loads that are likely to be executed on compute nodes, an overview of live migration, and some common issues to consider with focus on LTE Evolved Packet Core (EPC). This article uses VNF (Virtual Network Function) and  guest interchangeably. VNF essentially is a guest equivalent to a hardware Network Element. The Various Uses of Live Migration Here are some common live migration uses: Load Balancing – Migrating VMs between compute nodes to balance the load Hardware Maintenance – Routine maintenance, such as hardware upgrades, or  IPMI events such as thermal readings from sensors that indicate the node may fail soon for example cooling issues. This […]

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  • There are many companies shipping products based on ARMv8 today, including AMD, Samsung, NVIDIA, Cavium, Apple, Broadcom, Qualcomm, Huawei, and others.  What makes ARM unique is the differentiation between vendors; while a majority of features are based on the ARM reference processor and bus architectures, additional custom features may be introduced or reference features may be omitted at the vendor’s discretion. This results in various profiles that are tailored to specific products, making it extremely difficult for another architecture to compete against such a wide selection of choices. As ARMv8 matures, it’s moving out of mobile and embedded devices into Industrial IoT (Internet of Things), network routers, wireless infrastructure, and eventually, the cloud. For those of you not familiar with KVM, it stands for Kernel Virtual Machine. It’s a Linux Kernel hypervisor module. KVM is the primary open-source-based hypervisor, and is the default for Openstack, a popular cloud computing software […]

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