Category: Business

  • April 8, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Common Tools Used in Open Source Development

    This article is part of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. Up to this point, this guide has focused on the fundamental characteristics of open source communities and how these communities are organized. One of the major reasons these communities have organized around a relatively standard set of practices is because of the tools that are available to get work done in a distributed community. These tools must support individuals from diverse backgrounds who each have their own unique needs. This article will describe the tools that are commonly used in an open source community and will explain the roles they play in an open source community. Additionally, it will provide some insight into how to get the most out of them. Communication and Problem Solving Development in an open source community includes people from numerous timezones and cultures around the world. The tools used for communication in […]

    Read More
  • March 18, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    An Introduction to the Open Source Development Model

    This article is part of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. If you are someone who is accustomed to working in a traditional, proprietary software development, the open source development model might challenge many of your perceptions about how code is produced in large scale software development projects. This is a result of a fundamental requirement of transparency and communication which results in a development process that is distributed, extremely fast, and modular. This article will explore how development occurs in an open source community. It will also explain how a typical open source community operates in order to provide context for how the actual development of code is carried out. General Community Practices Open source development is a highly collaborative process, and the only way for this to be successful is for all participants to make their technical motivations, intentions, and plans related to their participation visible […]

    Read More
  • February 17, 2016 - Brian Warner

    Contribute Upstream to Manage Technical Debt

    One of the things that you’ll find in the world of corporate open source is that we tend to talk a lot about money. This makes sense of course, since open source has had a significant and lasting financial impact on the economics of software development. At the same time it also provides a useful metaphor for why we do what we do. These days, the Leveraged Development Model is pretty well understood: We all put a bit of development into a project, and in return we get to reap benefits far greater than the value of our own contribution. This dynamic is the main driver behind the saying, “Software is eating the world, and open source is eating software.” At this point, it’s virtually impossible to deliver a software product on time and within budget without open source; this is all the more true when your competitors are actively […]

    Read More
  • January 15, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Common Characteristics of an Open Source Community

    This article is part of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. Open source communities are as complex as the diverse individuals that contribute to them, and there is no one-size-fits-all definition of how they operate. With that said, there are a lot of common fundamental practices and organizational strategies that many communities migrate towards. This article will provide a general definition of how open source communities are organized and operate in order to provide greater context for the rest of the guide. New definitions Open Source – Denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be modified and redistributed. Upstream (noun) – The originating open source software project upon which a derivative is built. Maintainer (Committer) – An individual who is responsible for organizing code into source repositories, committing patches, and building the source code into binary packages for distribution. Community Organization […]

    Read More
  • We’d like to formally announce the launch of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. It’s no secret, open source is quickly becoming a business imperative, whether that means its use, development, or both. Any business that leads their industry over the coming decades will most likely do it through open source. Samsung is one of many major technology companies that are pushing for greater open source use and development in business through dedicated open source efforts like the Open Source Group here. With that said, the transition to using open source technology is rife with pitfalls, areas of confusion, and challenges that must be overcome for the transition to be a success. It can be very tricky for a company that has traditionally relied on proprietary software to navigate these waters without a guide, and this information is scattered across many sources, making it tough to develop a […]

    Read More
  • Open Source Wrap Up: November 14-20, 2015 Group of Biohackers Start Work on Open Source Insulin More than 370 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide, and these people rely on regular insulin injections to regulate the amount of sugar in their blood. Despite this major need for insulin, there is no generic version available on the market, and the high cost results in it having limited availability in poorer parts of the world. A group of citizen and academic researchers and biohackers, led by Counter Culture Labs, have launched a project to develop a simple method for producing insulin and release the process to the public domain. They have launched a crowdfunding campaign (that has already exceeded their goal) to fund the first stage of this research.  For stage 1, ” the team will insert an optimized DNA sequence for insulin into E. coli bacteria, induce the bacteria to express […]

    Read More
  • This is  the 2nd and final part of a series on measuring the value of open source developers. Part 1 can be found here. It’s been almost three years since the Open Source Group was established at Samsung. In that time we’ve grown quite a bit. Now that we’ve had some time to get our feet on the ground we’ve decided to take a look back at our impact. Why do We Need an Open Source Group Anyways? Samsung is on a multi-year journey to become both a better consumer of open source, and a better contributor and leader in the projects that end up in our products. The reasons for doing so are quite clear to us: while it’s easy to use code that’s made freely available, it’s risky and potentially quite expensive to rely upon it long-term, unless you are proactively working within the community. The reason it’s […]

    Read More
  • November 13, 2015 - Samsung Open Source Group

    A New AI, Medical Robots, and More in This Week’s Wrap Up

    Open Source Wrap Up: November 7 -13, 2015 Google Releases Open Source AI Engine: TensorFlow Google has released TensorFlow, deep learning that is used in many of the company’s products, as open source. The software uses a library for numerical computation inside data flow graphs that pass dynamically sized, multi-dimensional arrays, called tensors, between nodes. The nodes perform processing asynchronously, in parallel once all tensors on their incoming edges become available. This design makes TensorFlow flexible and portable as it is relatively simple to reconstruct data flow graphs and use high-level programming languages to develop new computational systems. Google has used this to connect artificial intelligence research with product teams that build new products that use this software. By releasing it as open source, the company hopes to bring more people into this convergence effort and standardize the set of tools people rely on for this work. To learn more, […]

    Read More
  • This is part 1 of a series on the value of an open source software development group for companies that rely on open source technology. If you’ve worked in a corporate development environment, you certainly understand that metrics are everything. If you’re doing development, you are probably familiar with the feeling that metrics aren’t perfect. I can’t count how many times I’ve heard, “Well, I’m measured on X because it generates a number, but let me tell you the real story…” Certain things are both meaningful and easy to measure such as the number of conference talks accepted and presented, internal training sessions delivered, or other employees that are mentored. But what do you do about code? What Does it Mean to Measure the Value of Your Open Source Contributors? As hard as it is to measure an individual developer’s code contributions using a standardized set of statistics, it can […]

    Read More
  • Last week, I was elected to the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board (TAB) during the Linux Kernel Summit in Seoul, South Korea. If anybody told me a couple of years ago, you are going to be elected to the TAB, I would have said “Are you kidding me?” Amazing things do happen! What Do We Do? The Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board is responsible for advising the Linux Foundation board of directors on technical, social, and political issues regarding Linux and Open Source. The TAB consists of 10 voting members elected by a vote amongst all invitees of the Linux Kernel Summit for a 2 year term. The TAB members are elected by the Linux Kernel Community to represent the views of Linux developers and to foster constructive communication between the Linux Foundation leadership and the Linux developer community. The TAB also acts in the background to identify and resolve […]

    Read More