Category: Business

  • We’d like to formally announce the launch of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. It’s no secret, open source is quickly becoming a business imperative, whether that means its use, development, or both. Any business that leads their industry over the coming decades will most likely do it through open source. Samsung is one of many major technology companies that are pushing for greater open source use and development in business through dedicated open source efforts like the Open Source Group here. With that said, the transition to using open source technology is rife with pitfalls, areas of confusion, and challenges that must be overcome for the transition to be a success. It can be very tricky for a company that has traditionally relied on proprietary software to navigate these waters without a guide, and this information is scattered across many sources, making it tough to develop a […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: November 14-20, 2015 Group of Biohackers Start Work on Open Source Insulin More than 370 million people suffer from diabetes worldwide, and these people rely on regular insulin injections to regulate the amount of sugar in their blood. Despite this major need for insulin, there is no generic version available on the market, and the high cost results in it having limited availability in poorer parts of the world. A group of citizen and academic researchers and biohackers, led by Counter Culture Labs, have launched a project to develop a simple method for producing insulin and release the process to the public domain. They have launched a crowdfunding campaign (that has already exceeded their goal) to fund the first stage of this research.  For stage 1, ” the team will insert an optimized DNA sequence for insulin into E. coli bacteria, induce the bacteria to express […]

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  • This is  the 2nd and final part of a series on measuring the value of open source developers. Part 1 can be found here. It’s been almost three years since the Open Source Group was established at Samsung. In that time we’ve grown quite a bit. Now that we’ve had some time to get our feet on the ground we’ve decided to take a look back at our impact. Why do We Need an Open Source Group Anyways? Samsung is on a multi-year journey to become both a better consumer of open source, and a better contributor and leader in the projects that end up in our products. The reasons for doing so are quite clear to us: while it’s easy to use code that’s made freely available, it’s risky and potentially quite expensive to rely upon it long-term, unless you are proactively working within the community. The reason it’s […]

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  • November 13, 2015 - Samsung Open Source Group

    A New AI, Medical Robots, and More in This Week’s Wrap Up

    Open Source Wrap Up: November 7 -13, 2015 Google Releases Open Source AI Engine: TensorFlow Google has released TensorFlow, deep learning that is used in many of the company’s products, as open source. The software uses a library for numerical computation inside data flow graphs that pass dynamically sized, multi-dimensional arrays, called tensors, between nodes. The nodes perform processing asynchronously, in parallel once all tensors on their incoming edges become available. This design makes TensorFlow flexible and portable as it is relatively simple to reconstruct data flow graphs and use high-level programming languages to develop new computational systems. Google has used this to connect artificial intelligence research with product teams that build new products that use this software. By releasing it as open source, the company hopes to bring more people into this convergence effort and standardize the set of tools people rely on for this work. To learn more, […]

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  • This is part 1 of a series on the value of an open source software development group for companies that rely on open source technology. If you’ve worked in a corporate development environment, you certainly understand that metrics are everything. If you’re doing development, you are probably familiar with the feeling that metrics aren’t perfect. I can’t count how many times I’ve heard, “Well, I’m measured on X because it generates a number, but let me tell you the real story…” Certain things are both meaningful and easy to measure such as the number of conference talks accepted and presented, internal training sessions delivered, or other employees that are mentored. But what do you do about code? What Does it Mean to Measure the Value of Your Open Source Contributors? As hard as it is to measure an individual developer’s code contributions using a standardized set of statistics, it can […]

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  • Last week, I was elected to the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board (TAB) during the Linux Kernel Summit in Seoul, South Korea. If anybody told me a couple of years ago, you are going to be elected to the TAB, I would have said “Are you kidding me?” Amazing things do happen! What Do We Do? The Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board is responsible for advising the Linux Foundation board of directors on technical, social, and political issues regarding Linux and Open Source. The TAB consists of 10 voting members elected by a vote amongst all invitees of the Linux Kernel Summit for a 2 year term. The TAB members are elected by the Linux Kernel Community to represent the views of Linux developers and to foster constructive communication between the Linux Foundation leadership and the Linux developer community. The TAB also acts in the background to identify and resolve […]

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  • Here at Samsung the Open Source Group, we use TWiki to file our weekly status reports, among other things. These reports include summaries of our upstream activity as measured by the number of patches we review for others and how many we land ourselves. There are various ways to collect these statistics programmatically; the question we’ll look at in this article is how to programmatically upload the data into Twiki. TWiki is a type of wiki software similar to what powers Wikipedia, WikiTravel, TV Tropes, Muppet.wikia, and on and on. TWiki has more of a corporate-oriented focus, and includes a wealth of functionality for structuring and formatting various types of data that a corporate team might need to create dynamic reports. Like all wiki’s, TWiki is set up to be easy for people to directly edit pages. It doesn’t require any background in HTML or CSS or JavaScript; you just […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: October 24-30, 2015 San Francisco Launches Open Source Voting System Development Effort Following the problems with hanging chads in the 2000 US Presidential Election cycle, the Federal government invested in developing electronic voting system. Since then, little has been done to improve these systems, and the proprietary electronic voting systems that were developed have come under scrutiny for potential security flaws in recent years. The contract between the city of San Francisco and the company that developed their electronic voting will end in December 2016. Now, the city government is signaling support for developing open source voting software in an effort to produce a system that is more secure and transparent, and less expensive. Additionally, they want a system that can be adapted to meet changing voting laws and technology advancement. They estimate this system would take 2 years to develop and cost between $4 million […]

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  • October 29, 2015 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Wrapping Up A Productive Week in Seoul

    This week has been packed full of presentations, technical meetings, and professional networking in Seoul, South Korea. We sent more than a dozen people to attend the Korea Linux Forum, the Linux Kernel Summit, and the Samsung Open Source Conference and we had representation for nearly all of the open source projects we are involved with including EFL, Wayland, IoTivity, FFmpeg, Gstreamer, and more. We met countless talented individuals and we are extremely happy to get the chance to interact with Korean professionals as we seek to increase our interaction with individuals who could be valuable to the open source technology we rely on. Setting the Tone at KLF Our week started with a keynote from Ibrahim Haddad, the head of the OSG. He explained why open source is so valuable to Samsung and what we are doing as the company’s open source R&D group in order to improve the […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: October 17 – 23, 2015 Red Hat Acquires Ansible Red Hat has long been one of the most successful businesses in the open source industry, and part of their success has been the strategic purchases of companies that develop leading technology. One such recent technology is Ansible: a platform for IT automation and DevOps. Ansible has slowly emerged as the leader in a field full of stiff competition; this acquisition illustrates just how important Ansible has become. Recently, Red Hat has been investing significant time and money in the development of containers and their use in the cloud, and this acquisition will certainly expand their development efforts. Read the announcement here. France Citizens Open the Door for Open Source Following 20 days of public debate and more than 147,000 votes and 8,500 proposals, the French citizens have approved the Digital Republic Bill. This bill covers a […]

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