Category: Business

  • OSCON is one of the leading conferences in the open source world, and it attracts thousands of visitors every year to Portland, OR. This year’s event wrapped up on Friday, July 24, and the Samsung Open Source Group sent about a dozen representatives to the conference this year to present talks, interact with visitors, and staff a large booth that featured demos of a handful of the open source projects we are involved with. We’re still a pretty small group here at Samsung with less than 50 people scattered throughout the world, so it’s important to us that we raise awareness about the work we do and OSCON is a good opportunity for us to do so. Scratching Our Itches In true open source fashion, Samsung went to OSCON in order to scratch the company’s own itches. In other words, like most companies and organizations, we were there to help […]

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  • We’re approaching (in a few months) the 24th anniversary of the famous email that Linus Torvalds (then an anonymous college student) sent to the world announcing his ‘hobby’ operating system (Linux). A lot has changed since that email, and while Linus still maintains ultimate veto power over what goes into the Linux Kernel, the fundamental tenet of letting go of a portion of the control over his project to gain the advantages of mass collaboration remains. This is at the core of all open source projects, and even in 2015 it seems to be a lesson that some people in Corporate America still haven’t fully grasped. The good news is that pretty much every industry has recognized the huge value of consuming open source, whether it be for internal use in their enterprise infrastructure, or as the basis for successful product lines. However, there is still widespread corporate reluctance to […]

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  • Introduction Proper Open Source compliance gives you the ability to honor the obligations of open source licenses while protecting your own Intellectual Property (IP), as well as that of 3rd party software providers, from unintended disclosure. Companies that use open source software in their products should establish such a program to ensure compliance with all open source licenses. Basic elements of a compliance program include: policies, processes, guidelines, training, and automated source code audits. Compliance activities must be carefully planned and monitored to assure that objectives are met in a timely manner. There are three fundamental steps that comprise the core of a Free & Open Source Software (FOSS) compliance process: Identifying any open source software contained in an externally distributed product Reviewing and approving the intended use of FOSS Satisfying FOSS license obligations In this blog post, I’ll discuss a 7-step system you can use to improve and strengthen […]

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  • April 27, 2015 - Guy Martin and Ben Lloyd Pearson

    GearVRf: The Journey from Proprietary to Open Source

    The Open Source Group recently provided technical and strategic consulting to a Samsung team that has developed an exciting new Virtual Reality Framework. GearVRf is a rendering library to help speed application development on VR-supported Android devices. The team had a desire to launch an open source project around this code, and in this post we’ll share the process we went through to help them make this happen. We believe sharing this experience is important for two main reasons. First, readers with less experience in this area will gain a sense of what’s required to take internal code, make it available under an open source license and then drive its adoption by growing a developer community. Second, readers with more experience will hopefully give us feedback on how we can do this better the next time. What Does it Take to Launch a Successful Open Source Project? Our process started […]

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  • April 20, 2015 - Gurj Bahia

    Samsung Open Source Meets Europe

    A warm welcome from Europe! As Guy mentioned in his post, the Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) started in early 2013. Since then, the group has grown significantly and now has teams spread out over the whole world. In this post, I’ll focus on the OSG European office and leave the others (USA, Korea and India) for another time. Our European team has approximately 20 members with some of them located at the Samsung Research UK office in Staines-upon-Thames, within the M25 belt west of London. The rest of the team works either from their home offices or as part of an Samsung Open Source Group Lab at Szeged University in Hungary. The remote setup is a good example of how the OSG is changing Samsung’s internal culture, in addition to our external open source contributions. The goals of the OSG teams are the same in all branches. We aim […]

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  • Welcome everyone, to this, the new Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) blog! We’re glad you’re here, and we’re excited to show you what our team has been up to in the first two years of our existence, as well as what we’re working on going forward… But first, a little background… In 2012, Samsung leadership realized their consumption of Open Source software to help develop their products was increasing at a rapid pace.  Also, since most of the company’s developers were focused on product development, there was a lack of sufficient upstream contributions to give the company enough technical equity to influence the strategic direction of these key open source projects. Enter Ibrahim Haddad, formerly of the Linux Foundation, who was hired in early 2013 to start the Samsung Open Source Group, and charged with hiring strong open source talent in several key technology areas (system, web, multimedia, graphics, and […]

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