Category: Development

  • November 12, 2015 - Habib Virji

    The Layered Architecture of IoTivity

    This article is part 2 of a 4 part series on how IoTivity handles security for the connected IoT world. IoTivity is an implementation of the OIC standard. In part one of this series, I covered the how the client and server model is used to establish connectivity. The server hosts resources and the client finds and controls resources. Each resource is represented by a type that is standardized by the OIC and includes details such as addresses and access control policies. IoTivity has a layered architecture where each layer performs different functionality. This article will cover each of these layers. Multi-Bearer Support IoTivity supports Bluetooth Low Energy using GATT, Bluetooth EDR (Enhanced Data Rate) using RFCOMM, Dual IPv4/v6 stack, and XMPP (remote access connectivity). All of the details for each of these bearers is hidden in the connectivity abstraction layer. The IoTivity stack has support for these bearers built in by […]

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  • This is part 1 of a series on the value of an open source software development group for companies that rely on open source technology. If you’ve worked in a corporate development environment, you certainly understand that metrics are everything. If you’re doing development, you are probably familiar with the feeling that metrics aren’t perfect. I can’t count how many times I’ve heard, “Well, I’m measured on X because it generates a number, but let me tell you the real story…” Certain things are both meaningful and easy to measure such as the number of conference talks accepted and presented, internal training sessions delivered, or other employees that are mentored. But what do you do about code? What Does it Mean to Measure the Value of Your Open Source Contributors? As hard as it is to measure an individual developer’s code contributions using a standardized set of statistics, it can […]

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  • Last week, I was elected to the Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board (TAB) during the Linux Kernel Summit in Seoul, South Korea. If anybody told me a couple of years ago, you are going to be elected to the TAB, I would have said “Are you kidding me?” Amazing things do happen! What Do We Do? The Linux Foundation Technical Advisory Board is responsible for advising the Linux Foundation board of directors on technical, social, and political issues regarding Linux and Open Source. The TAB consists of 10 voting members elected by a vote amongst all invitees of the Linux Kernel Summit for a 2 year term. The TAB members are elected by the Linux Kernel Community to represent the views of Linux developers and to foster constructive communication between the Linux Foundation leadership and the Linux developer community. The TAB also acts in the background to identify and resolve […]

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  • Here at Samsung the Open Source Group, we use TWiki to file our weekly status reports, among other things. These reports include summaries of our upstream activity as measured by the number of patches we review for others and how many we land ourselves. There are various ways to collect these statistics programmatically; the question we’ll look at in this article is how to programmatically upload the data into Twiki. TWiki is a type of wiki software similar to what powers Wikipedia, WikiTravel, TV Tropes, Muppet.wikia, and on and on. TWiki has more of a corporate-oriented focus, and includes a wealth of functionality for structuring and formatting various types of data that a corporate team might need to create dynamic reports. Like all wiki’s, TWiki is set up to be easy for people to directly edit pages. It doesn’t require any background in HTML or CSS or JavaScript; you just […]

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  • October 29, 2015 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Wrapping Up A Productive Week in Seoul

    This week has been packed full of presentations, technical meetings, and professional networking in Seoul, South Korea. We sent more than a dozen people to attend the Korea Linux Forum, the Linux Kernel Summit, and the Samsung Open Source Conference and we had representation for nearly all of the open source projects we are involved with including EFL, Wayland, IoTivity, FFmpeg, Gstreamer, and more. We met countless talented individuals and we are extremely happy to get the chance to interact with Korean professionals as we seek to increase our interaction with individuals who could be valuable to the open source technology we rely on. Setting the Tone at KLF Our week started with a keynote from Ibrahim Haddad, the head of the OSG. He explained why open source is so valuable to Samsung and what we are doing as the company’s open source R&D group in order to improve the […]

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  • October 21, 2015 - Samsung Open Source Group

    The OSG Gears Up for Korea

    Considering that our primary headquarters is in South Korea, it only makes sense that open source conferences in Seoul are a bit of a big deal to us. Next week we have two major conferences there: Korea Linux Forum and the Samsung Open Source Conference (SOSCON).  We are pulling all the stops for these conferences and are sending most of our team for three days of technical discussions and networking. If you are going to be at either of these events next week, keep an eye out for our team. We have quite a few people who will be giving presentations on both technical and non technical subjects, so here’s a preview of what we’ll be talking about. Korea Linux Forum You can find the full event schedule here. Why is Open Source R&D Important and What are We Doing About it? – Ibrahim Haddad (opening keynote) Ibrahim Haddad, the […]

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  • October 16, 2015 - Samsung Open Source Group

    In This Week’s Wrap Up: A Portable VPN, CDN Caching, and Space!

    Open Source Wrap Up: October 10 – 16, 2015 NASA Releases Massive VICAR Collection as Open Source NASA has been developing Video Image Communication and Retrieval (VICAR) software since the 1960’s, and this software has been used for transporting image and video data from many missions into space. They have released the suite of VICAR tools they use as open source.  NASA has been getting more involved in open source communities for some time, and this is just another development in a series of positive moves towards greater open source use and development. The source code for the VICAR software can be found on GitHub and it includes more than 350 applications. The use of this software has grown from unmanned planetary spacecraft to include biomedical image processing, cartography, geological exploration, and more. Portable, Open Source VPN Finishes Successful KickStarter InvizBox Go is a new product being developed by a […]

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  • I’ve been at Samsung in the Open Source Group as Senior Open Source Strategist for about three months now, and one of the most exciting parts of my job is to help internal groups prepare to spin up new open source projects. This is something that I particularly enjoy, having spent five years at The Linux Foundation doing pretty much the same thing (albeit seated in a different place at the table). So You Think You Can Open Source? One of the things I’ve noticed over the past few years is that it’s really easy and exciting for people to say, “Open source is hot! Let’s create a new project, do some open source-y stuff, and change the world! And let’s tell the boss we’re doing this right away!” In some cases (including a few I’m working on right now) this genuinely is the case. Truly transformative technologies tend to […]

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  • October 13, 2015 - Daniel Kolesa

    Some Final Thoughts on C++11

    This article is part 4 of a 4 part series on the benefits of the C++11 revision of the C++ programming language. The previous three articles in this series introduced readers to C++11 toolchains and some of the biggest features this revision of C++ provides. This article covers a handful of minor features that are still quite valuable for anyone writing software in C++11 including range-based for loops, initializer lists, null pointer constants, strongly typed enumerations, static asserts, user defined literals and more. Finally, this article closes with an introduction to a personal project of mine that makes a handful of things in C++11 easier. Other improvements There are quite a few features of C++11 that are worth mentioning, even if they don’t warrant as detailed an entry as the last two articles in this series. Range-based for Loop There is now a new for loop syntax for iterating over […]

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  • September 30, 2015 - Daniel Kolesa

    4 More Reasons You Should Use C++11

    This article is part 3 of a 4 part series on the benefits of the C++11 revision of the C++ programming language C++11 is the first update to the standard since 2003 and brings many significant features into the language. This article covers 4 more features that are significant: lambda expressions, expression SFINAE, rvalue references and move semantics, and constexpr. Lambda expressions allow you to use functions in expression contexts. C++ also integrates basic closure functionality to share data between nested lambdas, allowing for cleaner functional style programming. However, as it has no garbage collection, effortless resource management with escaping closures is not possible (there are ways such as reference counting though). Expression SFINAE extends the original SFINAE rule, allowing for much cleaner template metaprogramming. Move semantics allow for more efficient and safer management of resources. Finally, constexpr extends certain parts of the language to compile time, allowing for various […]

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