Category: Development

  • September 30, 2015 - Daniel Kolesa

    4 More Reasons You Should Use C++11

    This article is part 3 of a 4 part series on the benefits of the C++11 revision of the C++ programming language C++11 is the first update to the standard since 2003 and brings many significant features into the language. This article covers 4 more features that are significant: lambda expressions, expression SFINAE, rvalue references and move semantics, and constexpr. Lambda expressions allow you to use functions in expression contexts. C++ also integrates basic closure functionality to share data between nested lambdas, allowing for cleaner functional style programming. However, as it has no garbage collection, effortless resource management with escaping closures is not possible (there are ways such as reference counting though). Expression SFINAE extends the original SFINAE rule, allowing for much cleaner template metaprogramming. Move semantics allow for more efficient and safer management of resources. Finally, constexpr extends certain parts of the language to compile time, allowing for various […]

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  • September 22, 2015 - Daniel Kolesa

    3 Reasons You Should Use C++11

    This article is part 2 of a 4 part series on the benefits of the C++11 revision of the C++ programming language C++11 is the first update to the standard since 2003 and brings many significant features into the language. This article covers three of the most valuable features of C++11: variadic templates, type and template aliases, and type inference. Variadic templates provide functionality to handle type packs, allowing you to create templates with a variable number of template parameters as well as true, type safe variadic functions. The new type alias syntax allows for better readability and templating. Type inference lets the language deduce types of expressions, thus reducing verbosity and removing the need to explicitly specify types in many places. Variadic Templates In my opinion variadic templates are the single most useful feature introduced in the new standard. They provide the ability to create type packs, allowing for […]

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  • September 16, 2015 - Bryce Harrington

    Wayland: Atomics Ahead!

    This post will take a look at the current state of upstream Wayland as the community prepares for the upcoming 1.9 release. The core of the project is quite mature and is currently in a holding pattern as KDE, GNOME, EFL, and others complete their Wayland transitions. As this proceeds the Wayland community will be responding to the needs of these other projects. Most notably, there is a need to complete the XDG Shell protocol. This aims to become a standard across all desktop environments, but it needs to have strong buy in and collaboration from the desktop environment projects themselves. There’s a number of conversations that need to occur before anything can be nailed down effectively, but the desktop environment developers need to be relatively far along in their implementations before they can have strong enough opinions on what the desktop API should look like. Exterminating Bugs There are […]

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  • This article contains a summary of the discussions that took place at the Media Controller Workshop in Espoo, Finland from July 29 – 31, 2015. A more detailed breakdown of these discussions can be found on Linux TV. This is the first  workshop dedicated to the Linux Media Controller. It follows a v4l summit that took place back in 2010 in Finland that established the current foundation for the media controller. This was aimed at properly satisfying the needs of reporting pipelines on the smartphone System on a Chip (SoC). The focus of this year’s workshop was to clarify the kernel→userspace interfaces and extend the Media Controller to be used on other subsystems that need to represent graphs like Linux Digital Video Broadcasting (DVB), Advanced Linux Sound Architecture (ALSA), and Industrial I/O (IIO). Samsung had a strong representation at this workshop, including Shuah Khan and Mauro Carvalho Chehab from the […]

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  • August 21, 2015 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Linux Continues Full Steam Ahead: LinuxCon 2015

    A few of us from the Samsung Open Source Group had the pleasure of attending LinuxCon in Seattle this week. It attracted more than 1,500 professionals from the Linux community and the rest of the open source industry for presentations, conversations, and general mingling. For the first time, LinuxCon was colocated with ContainerCon which, in addition to CloudOpen, brought quite a few experts from companies that work on cloud technologies and virtualization. Linux is at the Center of an Ever-Growing Ecosystem Anyone familiar with the Linux Foundation probably knows the community is as strong as ever and shows little sign of slowing down. Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, explained this in his opening keynote when he stated that  nearly 3,000 developers have contributed more than 64 million lines of code to Linux Foundation collaborative projects (not including the Linux Kernel). These contributions represent $5.1 billion in […]

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  • August 18, 2015 - Daniel Kolesa

    Introduction to C++11 Toolchains

    This article is part 1 of a 4 part series on the benefits of the C++11 revision of the C++ programming language The C++11 standard has been with us for quite a while, but it hasn’t yet gained traction as significantly as one might expect. It’s a shame as there are many reasons to utilize C++11 features, and the toolchain support is pretty good, especially on Unix-like systems with Windows finally catching up. I decided to write a series of articles to advertise the benefits of C++11 and provide an explanation of some of the new features. I found various resources on the web that are quite misleading, so I feel it is important to clarify some things. This article will focus on three of the popular toolchains used for compiling C++ programs. Toolchain Coverage C++11 toolchain support seems to be pretty good. These are the main three compilers most […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: August 8-14, 2015 Google Launches Showcase for Experimental, Open Source Android Apps Google has launched Android Experiments, a site that showcases apps that use cutting edge technology with clean, modern aesthetics and interfaces. All of the apps hosted on Android Experiments are open source, allowing other developers to learn from these examples and use them to build their own software. The mobile app market has been slow to adopt open source, which prevents a lot of newcomers from creating their first app by making it significantly more challenging to start. Google seeks to address this with Android Experiments by allowing anyone to submit apps to be included in the showcase. New Simple, Cheap, Open Source Nitrate Tester Nitrate pollution as a result of agricultural runoff is a major problem for the world’s waterways. Commercial testing of nitrate levels is an expensive process that involves proprietary tools […]

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  • August 10, 2015 - Brian Warner

    Tizen Has Serious Momentum in India

    I was fortunate enough to attend the third Tizen Developer Summit, hosted this year in Bengaluru, India. What a great experience! As you might be aware, I recently joined Samsung from the Linux Foundation (more on this in the future), where I was the manager of the Tizen project. I’ve been involved in every Tizen event since the beginning, but there was something special about this one that felt like a milestone had been passed, and it wasen’t just because of the million Samsung Z1 smartphones that have been sold since launch. People are Flocking to Tizen I wasn’t surprised simply by the size of the event; there were more than one thousand attendees at what’s typically Tizen’s smaller event every year. Nor was I surprised by the 500 plus people that signed up for the Tizen DevLab, 2.5 times more people than we had seats for. Although it is […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: August 1 – 7, 2015 18F Releases Style Guide for Open Source Project Documentation 18F is a US Government organization inside the General Services Administration that helps federal agencies adopt modern approaches to managing and delivering digital services. They’ve worked on initiatives with the Department of Labor, Social Security Administration, Department of Defense, and more to help them adopt modern technologies. A big part of the work 18F does is rooted in open source, and the organization has released a style guide for open source projects. The guide includes information to improve a project’s success on places like GitHub. It covers things like naming the project, writing repo descriptions, writing good README files, and best practices for using a wiki. The guide is full of great information about how to best help potential contributors through proper documentation. Check out the Open Source Style Guide here. US House […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: July 25 – 31, 2015 Open Source Continues to be Valuable to Large Enterprises Wipro recently commissioned The Open Source Era: a study from Oxford Economics to provide insight into the future of open source usage in large enterprises. The study surveyed C-level executives and people that report directly to c-level executives from a wide range of industries including financial services, retail and consumer products, healthcare, and government. Here are some notable findings from the study: 52% of respondents say open source is already supporting development of new products and services. 63% of respondents say open source will be critical to agility over the next three years 75% of respondents report problems integrating open source with existing systems. 56% of respondents report problems with a lack of talent for meeting technology goals. These numbers show that despite the widespread success of open source in large enterprises, […]

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