Category: Embedded Technology

  • August 3, 2016 - Phil Coval

    How to Boot Tizen on ARTIK

    The fact that Tizen can be run on ARTIK is not the latest breaking news, considering it was previously demonstrated live at the 2015 Tizen Conference. There, the ARTIK project was also explained as an IoT platform of choice. Since then, ARTIK has become a new Tizen reference device, so here are a couple of hints that will help you test upcoming Tizen release on this hardware. First let me point out that Tizen’s wiki has a special ARTIK category, where you’ll find ongoing documentation efforts, you’ll want to bookmark this page. In this article, I will provide a deeper explanation of how to use the bleeding edge version of Tizen:3.0:Common on ARTIK10, and how to start working on this platform. As explained in my previous Yocto/meta-artik article, I suggest you avoid using the eMMC for development purposes; for this article I will boot the ARTIK from an SDcard. In […]

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  • July 11, 2016 - Mike Blumenkrantz

    How to Create Enlightenment Gadgets

    Creating desktop widgets, aka “gadgets,” has never been easier for Enlightenment enthusiasts than it is after the E21 release. The new E_Gadget system provides an updated API for integrating objects into the compositor, removing most of the overhead from the E_Gadcon system. This makes writing gadgets nearly identical to ordinary application writing. This post will serve as an introduction on the topic of writing gadgets with a focus on the basics; it will use the Start gadget as a reference. How to Create a Gadget The first step to integrating a new gadget is to add the new gadget type to the subsystem so the user can access it. This is done with the following function:

    This function coincides with related callbacks:

    Using e_gadget_type_add, a developer can implement gadgets of type, calling callback to create the gadget object, and optionally providing wizard callback to run configuration options for […]

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  • June 13, 2016 - Phil Coval and Mats Wichmann

    How to Run IoTivity on ARTIK with Yocto

    Samsung ARTIK is described by its developers as an end-to-end, integrated IoT platform that transforms the process of building, launching, and managing IoT products. I first saw one a year ago at the Samsung VIPEvent 2015 in Paris, but now there is an ARTIK10 on my desk and I would like to share some of my experiences of it with you. In this post, I will show how to build a whole GNU/Linux system using Yocto, a project that provides great flexibility in mixing and matching components and customizing an environment to support new hardware or interesting software like IoTivity. If you’re looking for Tizen support, it’s already here (check at bottom of this article), but this post will focus on a generic Linux build. Many of the board’s features I will be covering in this article are briefly introduced in the following video: https://youtu.be/7ZUYF21d1zo?#iotivity-artik-20160505rzr.mp4 There are 3 ARTIK models […]

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  • June 10, 2016 - Mike Blumenkrantz and Derek Foreman

    Upcoming Enlightenment Improvements: DMABuf & Teamwork V2

    E21 has been under heavy development since December of last year; the primary goals for have been to provide a more rapid release and expedite improvements in Wayland compositing to provide a much more usable experience. With the release pending, here’s a roundup of a couple recently-added Wayland features that are coming in this release. Improving Memory Sharing for Video Processing with DMABuf DMABuf is an infrastructure for sharing memory between various pieces of hardware. It’s a key technology to enable a high performance video pipeline without wasted memory copies, but its benefits aren’t limited to video processing and playback. EFL and Enlightenment now both support the Wayland DMABuf protocol, allowing clients to create buffers that can be dropped into a hardware video plane or used as a texture by the GPU, without the inherent memory copy required for wl_shm buffers. While this is good news for video players, we’ve […]

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  • I recently installed Ubuntu 15.10 on Odroid-XU4 and set out to run the upstream kernel on it. After several trials and errors and being forced to reference various forums, I now have Odroid running the Linux 4.6 Kernel. In this article, I will share how to quickly get from unboxing to running the latest kernel with a short detour to upgrade to the Ubuntu 16.04 release. Without further ado, let’s get started. First of all, download the Ubuntu 15.10 image. You can find the release notes and self installing image here: Release notes for Ubuntu 15.10 (v1.0) ubuntu-15.10-mate-odroid-xu3-20160114.img.xz Prepare the microSD Card Once you’ve downloaded the image from the 2nd link above, follow the following steps to create a bootable microSD card with the image; I used a 32 GB Samsung microSD card. Insert the microSD card in its SD card adapter case in the SD card slot on your host PC or […]

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  • May 17, 2016 - Sanjeev BA and Phil Coval

    OSG, OCF, & An Automotive Fortnight!

    The Samsung Open Source Group is playing an active role in the promotion and adoption of IoT standards across multiple domains. Samsung understands the importance of openness and collaboration to realize the full potential of IoT. One of the key promises we’ve made,  is to be open and collaborative in our approach to delivering products and solutions to our customers. This was a core part of the Samsung strategy, as explained in the following video. Samsung has remain committed to this approach and continued to deliver on the promise, year after year. Based on these principles the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), a global consortium of leading companies (~170 and growing) focused on creating a standard for interoperable devices and services was founded in 2014. The OCF approach has three key deliverables: An Open Specification: Open Connectivity Foundation An Open Source Implementation: IoTivity A membership driven certification program:  OCF certification Through this approach, OCF has created […]

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  • February 23, 2016 - Phil Coval

    IoTivity is Getting Ready for Automotive

    Samsung has recently intensified its focus on improving the driving experience with the launch of Connect Auto. As a coincidence, I tried to put together different efforts from our group to into an open connected car experiment. Check out this video which shows a DIY Tizen fan that’s controlled from an Automotive Linux system and Tizen TM1 mobile device: It’s All About Interoperability It might look a bit over-engineered with all of the devices in this demonstration, but the purpose is to validate communication between devices on a network (WiFi, BT, BLE) in various contexts. Of course, it’s possible to adapt the DIY fan to use an automatic gate mechanism or something else to interact with the driver, or it could even use cloud services that ensure the necessary level of security. Interoperability is the key word here, I believe we’re headed in the right direction following the recent Open […]

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  • As I illustrated in my previous article, the current capability of the Linux Kernel scheduler is far from giving us the most efficient use of the hardware we have; this needs to be fixed. The kernel community is hard at work attempting to fix this issue, and we should understand how they intend to do so to make sure that user space applications will be ready to take advantage of it. The Direction Taken by the Kernel Community Obviously this is easier said than done; even so, there is huge work being completed in the Kernel community to fix this issue. The solution is simple to describe, but very hard to implement as it touches one of the core components of Linux. Essentially, the scheduler should incorporate the work of cpuidle and cpufreq, and both cpuidle and cpufreq should be eliminated. Amit Kucheria offers a great read on this subject, […]

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  • January 8, 2016 - Mike Blumenkrantz

    Desktop Compositing: How Much Overdraw Is Too Much?

    In my previous post on compositing, I covered the overall methodology with which I implemented Compiz plugin support in the Enlightenment compositor. Now I’m going to go into some detail about the rendering portion. The first thing that should be reiterated is Compiz only performs damage calculations for the entire screen and does not track them per-window. This is, to say the least, problematic. There’s no way to easily predict where a window will draw at any given time either: there are window effects that cause clients to zoom in/out to/from the mouse cursor, and others that cause the client to bounce around outside of its frame region. The compositor must be prepared to draw things for each window at any geometry on the screen at any time, regardless of common sense clipping. Rendering Outside the Box The first attempt I made at getting things to work was to just […]

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  • January 7, 2016 - Samsung Open Source Group

    Spend Some Time With the Tizen Community at FOSDEM 2016

    For the 5th year in a row, the Tizen community will meet at FOSDEM: one of the most important free and open source software conferences in Europe. Members of the Tizen community from all over the world, including South Korea, Poland, UK, Bulgaria, and France will converge  on January 31 and February 1, 2016 at ULB Solbosch Campus, Brussels, Belgium. Here’s what you can expect from the Tizen community, this year: Meet Tizen developers from around the world for discussions. Interact with demos at the EFL/Tizen booth. Dine with Tizen developers at the community dinner. Learn and discover about free and open source software. Join Our Casual Dinner Meeting! If you are interested in Tizen presence at the conference, just bookmark Tizen’s wiki FOSDEM page and join us. There you will find details about latest news and plans including the Tizen community dinner that will occur on the evening of […]

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