Category: Internet of Things

  • May 17, 2016 - Sanjeev BA and Phil Coval

    OSG, OCF, & An Automotive Fortnight!

    The Samsung Open Source Group is playing an active role in the promotion and adoption of IoT standards across multiple domains. Samsung understands the importance of openness and collaboration to realize the full potential of IoT. One of the key promises we’ve made,  is to be open and collaborative in our approach to delivering products and solutions to our customers. This was a core part of the Samsung strategy, as explained in the following video. Samsung has remain committed to this approach and continued to deliver on the promise, year after year. Based on these principles the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), a global consortium of leading companies (~170 and growing) focused on creating a standard for interoperable devices and services was founded in 2014. The OCF approach has three key deliverables: An Open Specification: Open Connectivity Foundation An Open Source Implementation: IoTivity A membership driven certification program:  OCF certification Through this approach, OCF has created […]

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  • February 23, 2016 - Phil Coval

    IoTivity is Getting Ready for Automotive

    Samsung has recently intensified its focus on improving the driving experience with the launch of Connect Auto. As a coincidence, I tried to put together different efforts from our group to into an open connected car experiment. Check out this video which shows a DIY Tizen fan that’s controlled from an Automotive Linux system and Tizen TM1 mobile device: It’s All About Interoperability It might look a bit over-engineered with all of the devices in this demonstration, but the purpose is to validate communication between devices on a network (WiFi, BT, BLE) in various contexts. Of course, it’s possible to adapt the DIY fan to use an automatic gate mechanism or something else to interact with the driver, or it could even use cloud services that ensure the necessary level of security. Interoperability is the key word here, I believe we’re headed in the right direction following the recent Open […]

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  • January 7, 2016 - Samsung Open Source Group

    Spend Some Time With the Tizen Community at FOSDEM 2016

    For the 5th year in a row, the Tizen community will meet at FOSDEM: one of the most important free and open source software conferences in Europe. Members of the Tizen community from all over the world, including South Korea, Poland, UK, Bulgaria, and France will converge  on January 31 and February 1, 2016 at ULB Solbosch Campus, Brussels, Belgium. Here’s what you can expect from the Tizen community, this year: Meet Tizen developers from around the world for discussions. Interact with demos at the EFL/Tizen booth. Dine with Tizen developers at the community dinner. Learn and discover about free and open source software. Join Our Casual Dinner Meeting! If you are interested in Tizen presence at the conference, just bookmark Tizen’s wiki FOSDEM page and join us. There you will find details about latest news and plans including the Tizen community dinner that will occur on the evening of […]

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  • November 12, 2015 - Habib Virji

    The Layered Architecture of IoTivity

    This article is part 2 of a 4 part series on how IoTivity handles security for the connected IoT world. IoTivity is an implementation of the OIC standard. In part one of this series, I covered the how the client and server model is used to establish connectivity. The server hosts resources and the client finds and controls resources. Each resource is represented by a type that is standardized by the OIC and includes details such as addresses and access control policies. IoTivity has a layered architecture where each layer performs different functionality. This article will cover each of these layers. Multi-Bearer Support IoTivity supports Bluetooth Low Energy using GATT, Bluetooth EDR (Enhanced Data Rate) using RFCOMM, Dual IPv4/v6 stack, and XMPP (remote access connectivity). All of the details for each of these bearers is hidden in the connectivity abstraction layer. The IoTivity stack has support for these bearers built in by […]

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  • October 26, 2015 - Habib Virji

    The Essentials of IoTivity Connectivity

    This article is part 1 of a 3 part series on how IoTivity handles security for the connected IoT world. IoTivity is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project that implements the Open Interconnect Consortium (OIC) standard. OIC is a consortium of over 100 companies that are working together to develop a standard for interoperability between the IoT devices. It includes a certification program to check interoperability between devices from different manufacturers. The OIC has various task groups that each address different areas in the IoT domain. The primary group is the core group which defines the base layer and lays the foundation for the other task groups. The other prominent task groups include security and remote connectivity. The security task group defines the base security layer that is expected in each device; this allows devices to secure trust and provide an access control policy for other devices in a house. Remote […]

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  • October 21, 2015 - Samsung Open Source Group

    The OSG Gears Up for Korea

    Considering that our primary headquarters is in South Korea, it only makes sense that open source conferences in Seoul are a bit of a big deal to us. Next week we have two major conferences there: Korea Linux Forum and the Samsung Open Source Conference (SOSCON).  We are pulling all the stops for these conferences and are sending most of our team for three days of technical discussions and networking. If you are going to be at either of these events next week, keep an eye out for our team. We have quite a few people who will be giving presentations on both technical and non technical subjects, so here’s a preview of what we’ll be talking about. Korea Linux Forum You can find the full event schedule here. Why is Open Source R&D Important and What are We Doing About it? – Ibrahim Haddad (opening keynote) Ibrahim Haddad, the […]

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  • September 18, 2015 - Samsung Open Source Group

    Come Get Your SSL/TLS Encryption and More, in This Week’s Wrap Up

    Open Source Wrap Up: September 12-18, 2015 Let’s Encrypt Issues First SSL/TLS Certificate. Let’s Encrypt is a Linux Foundation Collaborative project that will serve as a certificate authority that makes SSL/TLS certificate provisioning much simpler. The project will distribute free SSL/TLS certificates, which will simplify the process of setting up encrypted communications over the web; this is something many leading tech companies have been pushing for heavily in recent years. The first certificate has been issued to their own test website; currently it requires visitors to install an ISRG root certificate, but the project is working with IdenTrust, a certificate authority, to cross sign the project’s certificates. Once this process is finished, all certificates issued by Let’s Encrypt will be trusted across the web. The project will gradually roll more certificates out to pre-selected websites in the coming weeks before opening up the process to the general public on November […]

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  • August 21, 2015 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Linux Continues Full Steam Ahead: LinuxCon 2015

    A few of us from the Samsung Open Source Group had the pleasure of attending LinuxCon in Seattle this week. It attracted more than 1,500 professionals from the Linux community and the rest of the open source industry for presentations, conversations, and general mingling. For the first time, LinuxCon was colocated with ContainerCon which, in addition to CloudOpen, brought quite a few experts from companies that work on cloud technologies and virtualization. Linux is at the Center of an Ever-Growing Ecosystem Anyone familiar with the Linux Foundation probably knows the community is as strong as ever and shows little sign of slowing down. Jim Zemlin, the executive director of the Linux Foundation, explained this in his opening keynote when he stated that  nearly 3,000 developers have contributed more than 64 million lines of code to Linux Foundation collaborative projects (not including the Linux Kernel). These contributions represent $5.1 billion in […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: July 18 – 24, 2015 Google Releases Kubernetes 1.0 Google has announced the release of Kubernetes 1.0 at OSCON. Kubernetes is a container deployment and management tool that has been under development by Google for a few years. This program has been the basis for running many of Google’s apps including their search, Gmail, Google Docs, and more. This release is a part of Google’s effort to get support for Kubernetes on more platforms including OpenStack and Microsoft Azure. The project has been Google’s most successful open source project and includes more than 14,000 commits from more than 400 contributors. Read more at ZDNet. IBM Launches developerWorks Open IBM has announced the launch of developerWorks Open, a new program aimed at improving adoption and development of new cloud innovations and mobile technologies. The project seeks to bridge the gap between open source developers and business needs […]

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  • July 21, 2015 - Mats Wichmann

    An Introduction to Tizen Compliance

    There is a whole world of smart devices out there, and Tizen has been built to run on many of them, including phones, televisions, cameras, appliances, cars, and more. The software that runs on top of these intelligent devices is what powers the new and interesting functionality that make up the Internet of Things. The latest generations of mobile devices have introduced new methods of installing apps in ways that allow them to be used on a wide range of devices, and this article will take a look at how Tizen makes sure that apps run on as many device types as possible through the Tizen Compliance program. How an App is Installed At the root of this is how apps are installed on an operating system. Traditional UNIX/Linux systems have several methods to install applications. One method is to hunt for the source code, build it, and run something […]

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