Category: IoTivity

  • April 7, 2017 - Phil Coval and Sanjeev BA

    How OCF is Creating the Connected Car

    The Connected Car & Fragmentation Traditional car manufacturers have begun including early iterations of touchscreen technology with access to media and apps that can also provide basic HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and A/C) controls for the vehicle. These features can often be accessed through mobile devices with tailor-made apps from each car maker. However, this has led to OEMs building their own ecosystem silos, similar to the trends observed in the smartphone industry. The lack of an open, standardized framework has resulted in a fragmented market, where experiences from one OEM won’t work with another in any streamlined way; consequently, developers aren’t thinking about how to provide a rich user experience that allows cars and drivers to work in unison; this is a huge missed opportunity. Samsung OSG, OCF, and IoTivity The Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) is creating a specification and sponsoring the IoTivity open source project to deliver an open and secure connectivity and […]

    Read More
  • A curious mind recently asked me to share materials about the OCF SmartHome demo, or perhaps I should call it the “Minimalist Smart Switch” instead. The demo was displayed at the Embedded Linux Conference in Berlin, and featured IoTivity running on an ARTIK10 SoC that connected to a Tizen Gear S2 Smartwatch; both run Tizen OS. You will find more technical details in the following slide deck. IoTivity Tutorial: Prototyping IoT Devices on GNU/Linux from Samsung Open Source Group Install Tizen and IoTivity If you want to run it this demo, you can download the system image and uncompress the archive directly to the SD card using QEMU tools.

    Once this is completed, insert the SD card into the ARTIK10 and turn it on; it will boot Tizen and launch the IoTivity server. For more information about this, check out the previous blog posts about booting tizen on ARTIK and […]

    Read More
  • You probably saw the announcement on October 10, 2016 that the Open Connectivity Foundation and the AllSeen Alliance will merge and create a ‘best of both’ IoT framework. To recap briefly, the Board of Directors from both organizations have agreed to consolidate operations under the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), while the open source projects will continue to be hosted at the Linux Foundation. I’ve noticed some confusion about what exactly happened, so I thought I would clarify some things in this article. To start, OCF and the AllSeen Alliance are each non-profit entities that are responsible for the business operations of each project. In addition, OCF hosts development of the specification. Each organization has their own bylaws, membership agreement, IPR policy, and charter. By law they must be governed by a board of directors, which consists of representatives from member organizations. One of the major differences between the two is that […]

    Read More
  • August 3, 2016 - Phil Coval

    How to Boot Tizen on ARTIK

    The fact that Tizen can be run on ARTIK is not the latest breaking news, considering it was previously demonstrated live at the 2015 Tizen Conference. There, the ARTIK project was also explained as an IoT platform of choice. Since then, ARTIK has become a new Tizen reference device, so here are a couple of hints that will help you test upcoming Tizen release on this hardware. First let me point out that Tizen’s wiki has a special ARTIK category, where you’ll find ongoing documentation efforts, you’ll want to bookmark this page. In this article, I will provide a deeper explanation of how to use the bleeding edge version of Tizen:3.0:Common on ARTIK10, and how to start working on this platform. As explained in my previous Yocto/meta-artik article, I suggest you avoid using the eMMC for development purposes; for this article I will boot the ARTIK from an SDcard. In […]

    Read More
  • June 13, 2016 - Phil Coval and Mats Wichmann

    How to Run IoTivity on ARTIK with Yocto

    Samsung ARTIK is described by its developers as an end-to-end, integrated IoT platform that transforms the process of building, launching, and managing IoT products. I first saw one a year ago at the Samsung VIPEvent 2015 in Paris, but now there is an ARTIK10 on my desk and I would like to share some of my experiences of it with you. In this post, I will show how to build a whole GNU/Linux system using Yocto, a project that provides great flexibility in mixing and matching components and customizing an environment to support new hardware or interesting software like IoTivity. If you’re looking for Tizen support, it’s already here (check at bottom of this article), but this post will focus on a generic Linux build. Many of the board’s features I will be covering in this article are briefly introduced in the following video: https://youtu.be/7ZUYF21d1zo?#iotivity-artik-20160505rzr.mp4 There are 3 ARTIK models […]

    Read More
  • May 17, 2016 - Sanjeev BA and Phil Coval

    OSG, OCF, & An Automotive Fortnight!

    The Samsung Open Source Group is playing an active role in the promotion and adoption of IoT standards across multiple domains. Samsung understands the importance of openness and collaboration to realize the full potential of IoT. One of the key promises we’ve made,  is to be open and collaborative in our approach to delivering products and solutions to our customers. This was a core part of the Samsung strategy, as explained in the following video. Samsung has remain committed to this approach and continued to deliver on the promise, year after year. Based on these principles the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), a global consortium of leading companies (~170 and growing) focused on creating a standard for interoperable devices and services was founded in 2014. The OCF approach has three key deliverables: An Open Specification: Open Connectivity Foundation An Open Source Implementation: IoTivity A membership driven certification program:  OCF certification Through this approach, OCF has created […]

    Read More
  • February 23, 2016 - Phil Coval

    IoTivity is Getting Ready for Automotive

    Samsung has recently intensified its focus on improving the driving experience with the launch of Connect Auto. As a coincidence, I tried to put together different efforts from our group to into an open connected car experiment. Check out this video which shows a DIY Tizen fan that’s controlled from an Automotive Linux system and Tizen TM1 mobile device: It’s All About Interoperability It might look a bit over-engineered with all of the devices in this demonstration, but the purpose is to validate communication between devices on a network (WiFi, BT, BLE) in various contexts. Of course, it’s possible to adapt the DIY fan to use an automatic gate mechanism or something else to interact with the driver, or it could even use cloud services that ensure the necessary level of security. Interoperability is the key word here, I believe we’re headed in the right direction following the recent Open […]

    Read More
  • January 7, 2016 - Samsung Open Source Group

    Spend Some Time With the Tizen Community at FOSDEM 2016

    For the 5th year in a row, the Tizen community will meet at FOSDEM: one of the most important free and open source software conferences in Europe. Members of the Tizen community from all over the world, including South Korea, Poland, UK, Bulgaria, and France will converge  on January 31 and February 1, 2016 at ULB Solbosch Campus, Brussels, Belgium. Here’s what you can expect from the Tizen community, this year: Meet Tizen developers from around the world for discussions. Interact with demos at the EFL/Tizen booth. Dine with Tizen developers at the community dinner. Learn and discover about free and open source software. Join Our Casual Dinner Meeting! If you are interested in Tizen presence at the conference, just bookmark Tizen’s wiki FOSDEM page and join us. There you will find details about latest news and plans including the Tizen community dinner that will occur on the evening of […]

    Read More
  • One of the great things about being in the Open Source Group at Samsung is that we get to work on cool stuff both inside and outside the company. As we’ve done in past years, Samsung is sponsoring a project in Jay Borenstein’s CS210 course at Stanford. The objective of CS210 is to expose students to corporate development practices by giving them real world design and development projects, pushing the envelope of technology and building something cool. Companies like Samsung can sponsor project teams by providing the building blocks for a project and mentoring students through the process. Smart Watch, Smart Home We are calling our project for 2016 Smart Watch, Smart Home. As you can probably guess, it will involve wearables and home automation; of course, it will involve open source. Home Automation Home automation products are nothing new and have been around for many years. However, recently there’s […]

    Read More
  • November 12, 2015 - Habib Virji

    The Layered Architecture of IoTivity

    This article is part 2 of a 4 part series on how IoTivity handles security for the connected IoT world. IoTivity is an implementation of the OIC standard. In part one of this series, I covered the how the client and server model is used to establish connectivity. The server hosts resources and the client finds and controls resources. Each resource is represented by a type that is standardized by the OIC and includes details such as addresses and access control policies. IoTivity has a layered architecture where each layer performs different functionality. This article will cover each of these layers. Multi-Bearer Support IoTivity supports Bluetooth Low Energy using GATT, Bluetooth EDR (Enhanced Data Rate) using RFCOMM, Dual IPv4/v6 stack, and XMPP (remote access connectivity). All of the details for each of these bearers is hidden in the connectivity abstraction layer. The IoTivity stack has support for these bearers built in by […]

    Read More