Category: IoTivity

  • One of the great things about being in the Open Source Group at Samsung is that we get to work on cool stuff both inside and outside the company. As we’ve done in past years, Samsung is sponsoring a project in Jay Borenstein’s CS210 course at Stanford. The objective of CS210 is to expose students to corporate development practices by giving them real world design and development projects, pushing the envelope of technology and building something cool. Companies like Samsung can sponsor project teams by providing the building blocks for a project and mentoring students through the process. Smart Watch, Smart Home We are calling our project for 2016 Smart Watch, Smart Home. As you can probably guess, it will involve wearables and home automation; of course, it will involve open source. Home Automation Home automation products are nothing new and have been around for many years. However, recently there’s […]

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  • November 12, 2015 - Habib Virji

    The Layered Architecture of IoTivity

    This article is part 2 of a 4 part series on how IoTivity handles security for the connected IoT world. IoTivity is an implementation of the OIC standard. In part one of this series, I covered the how the client and server model is used to establish connectivity. The server hosts resources and the client finds and controls resources. Each resource is represented by a type that is standardized by the OIC and includes details such as addresses and access control policies. IoTivity has a layered architecture where each layer performs different functionality. This article will cover each of these layers. Multi-Bearer Support IoTivity supports Bluetooth Low Energy using GATT, Bluetooth EDR (Enhanced Data Rate) using RFCOMM, Dual IPv4/v6 stack, and XMPP (remote access connectivity). All of the details for each of these bearers is hidden in the connectivity abstraction layer. The IoTivity stack has support for these bearers built in by […]

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  • October 29, 2015 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Wrapping Up A Productive Week in Seoul

    This week has been packed full of presentations, technical meetings, and professional networking in Seoul, South Korea. We sent more than a dozen people to attend the Korea Linux Forum, the Linux Kernel Summit, and the Samsung Open Source Conference and we had representation for nearly all of the open source projects we are involved with including EFL, Wayland, IoTivity, FFmpeg, Gstreamer, and more. We met countless talented individuals and we are extremely happy to get the chance to interact with Korean professionals as we seek to increase our interaction with individuals who could be valuable to the open source technology we rely on. Setting the Tone at KLF Our week started with a keynote from Ibrahim Haddad, the head of the OSG. He explained why open source is so valuable to Samsung and what we are doing as the company’s open source R&D group in order to improve the […]

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  • October 26, 2015 - Habib Virji

    The Essentials of IoTivity Connectivity

    This article is part 1 of a 3 part series on how IoTivity handles security for the connected IoT world. IoTivity is a Linux Foundation Collaborative Project that implements the Open Interconnect Consortium (OIC) standard. OIC is a consortium of over 100 companies that are working together to develop a standard for interoperability between the IoT devices. It includes a certification program to check interoperability between devices from different manufacturers. The OIC has various task groups that each address different areas in the IoT domain. The primary group is the core group which defines the base layer and lays the foundation for the other task groups. The other prominent task groups include security and remote connectivity. The security task group defines the base security layer that is expected in each device; this allows devices to secure trust and provide an access control policy for other devices in a house. Remote […]

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  • October 21, 2015 - Samsung Open Source Group

    The OSG Gears Up for Korea

    Considering that our primary headquarters is in South Korea, it only makes sense that open source conferences in Seoul are a bit of a big deal to us. Next week we have two major conferences there: Korea Linux Forum and the Samsung Open Source Conference (SOSCON).  We are pulling all the stops for these conferences and are sending most of our team for three days of technical discussions and networking. If you are going to be at either of these events next week, keep an eye out for our team. We have quite a few people who will be giving presentations on both technical and non technical subjects, so here’s a preview of what we’ll be talking about. Korea Linux Forum You can find the full event schedule here. Why is Open Source R&D Important and What are We Doing About it? – Ibrahim Haddad (opening keynote) Ibrahim Haddad, the […]

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  • OSCON is one of the leading conferences in the open source world, and it attracts thousands of visitors every year to Portland, OR. This year’s event wrapped up on Friday, July 24, and the Samsung Open Source Group sent about a dozen representatives to the conference this year to present talks, interact with visitors, and staff a large booth that featured demos of a handful of the open source projects we are involved with. We’re still a pretty small group here at Samsung with less than 50 people scattered throughout the world, so it’s important to us that we raise awareness about the work we do and OSCON is a good opportunity for us to do so. Scratching Our Itches In true open source fashion, Samsung went to OSCON in order to scratch the company’s own itches. In other words, like most companies and organizations, we were there to help […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up June 13 – 19, 2015 Let’s Encrypt Announces Launch Schedule Let’s encrypt is a Linux Foundation collaborative project that seeks to provide a free, automated, and open certificate authority to allow anyone to securely encrypt their website using HTTPS. Setting this service up will be as simple as running two commands on the Linux server that runs the site, simplifying the process of generating trusted certificates significantly. The project has announced their launch schedule for early testing of the service as well as general availability. The first certificates will be issued the week of July 27, 2015 and will gradually scale up to a general release the week of September 14, 2015. OIC Plugfest #2 Scheduled for End of June in Redmond, Washington The Open Interconnect Consortium will host its second interoperability plugfest June 23, 24 and 25th at VMC, Inc. in Redmond Washington. This three-day […]

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