Category: Leadership

  • If you’re reading this blog, you’re probably among the growing number of software professionals who understand how valuable open source development is to the production of modern technology. Many of us have seen how open source can reduce costs, increase development speed, increase overall product quality and more, but it can often be challenging to quantify the value of this using understandable metrics. Fortunately for us, open source development happens in public so a lot of information can be extracted from public resources such as git repository logs, email mailing lists, code review and bug tracking platforms, and more. One relatively new and useful tool to aide in this is GrimoireLab from Bitergia. We’ve spent the last few months exploring the capabilities of this tool to find out what kind of metrics we can use to track the success of the efforts of the Samsung Open Source Group. Doing so […]

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  • November 22, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Check Out the Free Open Source Compliance Handbook

    Open source compliance is often overlooked, but is a critical component of a successful open source software strategy. If your company is going to use or contribute to open source software, failure to comply with the software licenses can lead to costly cleanup efforts, or even lawsuits if license violations are found. To mitigate these risks, it’s important to establish an internal organizational program that manages compliance with open source licenses. For many companies, open source compliance is often the first major step into open source engineering, so it’s vital to establish proper organizations and procedures that build a foundation for continual success. That’s why Ibrahim Haddad joined forces with the Linux Foundation to create Open Source Compliance in the Enterprise, and released it as a free handbook to download. This book covers the essentials of establishing a successful open source compliance strategy in an enterprise setting, including the structure […]

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  • After finishing high school, I was destined to continue my academic life studying one of the fine arts I always loved: Architecture. I took special art classes to get prepared to study it, and so I did; I entered the architectural school at my hometown in the Canary Islands. In their first year, all students learn about the Bauhaus school and their impact. I knew about them, but in that year I learned about their philosophy in detail and I became sanely obsessed with their work. During their difficult social/political time, Bauhaus revolutionized the world of architecture, design, and art. Their modernist designs were centered in functionality, simplicity, rationality, and taking art to everybody through mass production. In summary, making our day to day habitats and tools better, cheaper, simpler, and available to all. So through most of my first year I asked myself “Where is the present-day Bauhaus?” I […]

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  • October 25, 2016 - Reynaldo Verdejo

    The 2016 GStreamer Hackfest & Conference in Berlin

    A few days ago, while on my way back from the GStreamer hackfest and conference combo, I tried to come up with a list of pearls to share here and arrived at a pretty troubling conclusion: there was no easy way to do so. The Hackfest I met Luis (De Bethencourt) a kilometer away from my hotel on a cold Saturday morning on October 8th. By then, I had already figured the only exercise I’d be able to get during my short 4-day stay in Berlin was going to be related to my commute, so I decided to embrace walking. We headed for C-Base as soon as we meet at his hotel’s lobby and arrived 10 minutes later to meet the typical familiar faces from the GStreamer community. So did everything start. The GStreamer developer community, while quite compact, has a surprisingly large number of regulars; people tend to stay around. This is something you hardly […]

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  • You probably saw the announcement on October 10, 2016 that the Open Connectivity Foundation and the AllSeen Alliance will merge and create a ‘best of both’ IoT framework. To recap briefly, the Board of Directors from both organizations have agreed to consolidate operations under the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), while the open source projects will continue to be hosted at the Linux Foundation. I’ve noticed some confusion about what exactly happened, so I thought I would clarify some things in this article. To start, OCF and the AllSeen Alliance are each non-profit entities that are responsible for the business operations of each project. In addition, OCF hosts development of the specification. Each organization has their own bylaws, membership agreement, IPR policy, and charter. By law they must be governed by a board of directors, which consists of representatives from member organizations. One of the major differences between the two is that […]

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  • The past week or so has seen a significant amount of progress in the gadget backend of Enlightenment, due in no small part to the constant poking and prodding from Stephen Houston: our newest Samsung OSG Intern. As he mentioned in his post, we’ve known each other for quite some time now, so mentoring him has allowed both of us to skip over most of the pleasantries and get down to the code. Establishing a Mutually-Beneficial Partnership This type of internship is certainly new to me; seldom do I get the opportunity to sponsor and mentor a member of the community who has already been a contributor for such a long time. Given that I’d been the only one to use the new gadget API released in Enlightenment v21, I was curious to see what others would think after spending some time developing on top of it; soliciting feedback on […]

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  • September 16, 2016 - Mike Blumenkrantz

    Announcing the Samsung Open Source Group Internship Program

    Today, I’m switching gears from my usual technical posts to introduce a new initiative that we’re rolling out at the Open Source Group: the OSG Internship Program. Since the start of our team in 2013 we’ve been involved in a number of projects in different areas of the open source ecosystem. In the process we’ve come across a number of great community members, but we’ve also realized that our team isn’t large enough to tackle all of the technical challenges that we’re facing in the open source projects we work on. At Samsung, we greatly appreciate the collaborative nature of our relationship with these communities, and all the more so since many long-term contributors are hobbyists and students. Our appreciation runs deep for contributors who are working in these communities on their own time, particularly those who work collaboratively with us as we are preparing for future products. From time […]

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  • Consistency is everything. If launching open source projects is part of your job, it is incredibly helpful to have a clear, consistent, and repeatable process for open sourcing code and building a project. Why? There are a few reasons. For one, it increases your odds of success if you can identify the parts of the process that worked well before, and repeat them. Project launches are about people as much as technology. There are actions that attract others, and actions that drive others away; it’s beneficial to remember which is which. If you can’t convince others to join and use your project, you may as well just post the code and be done with it. Another major reason is time. I seriously doubt I’m alone in observing that the typical “We’re launching an OSS project next month! Um, where do we start?” emails usually come with little warning. Most of the time […]

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  • Open source communities can be vast, have an extremely fast rate of development, and have numerous companies and individuals who influence the project’s direction. Because of this diversity and speed it can be very easy for a company’s contributions to be lost in the shuffle, and it’s vital for any company that wants to contribute significant code upstream to establish themselves within the community. We’ve worked hard to establish a strong open source engineering team here at Samsung, and we’ve learned a lot about what it takes to be successful at this along the way. Without further ado, here are 10 tips to help you improve your company’s success at contributing code to the an open source community. Hire key developers and maintainers from the community. This is a critical step that allows you to gain skills and expertise. Two or three people from any given project are enough to […]

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  • May 13, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    10 Steps to Being Successful in Open Source

    No blog is complete without a simplistic numbered list of images, and we’re no exception! Open source methodology can be a complicated subject, but that doesn’t mean we can’t try to boil it down to some easily-digestible snippets. We’re proud to present the 10 simple steps it takes to be successful in open source. All of the images in this article were created by Ibrahim Haddad and are shared under CC-BY-SA-4.0, so feel free to use them in your own work. 1. Setup business infrastructure to support open source It is extremely challenging for a company to be successful in open source if they haven’t setup the proper infrastructure to allow their employees to interact with an open source community; this includes the establishment of both technical infrastructure as well as organizational infrastructure. You need to make sure your developers have the policies, processes, and tools that are required to […]

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