Category: Leadership

  • The X.org Foundation is a non-profit governance entity charged with overseeing core components of the open source graphics community. X.org had been structured as a legal (non-profit) corporate entity registered in the state of Delaware for some years, which provided tax deduction on donations and other such benefits. Unfortunately, being a non-profit is not cheap and entails various administrative tasks – filing annual reports, maintaining a bank account, dealing with donations and expenses, and so on – so the overhead of being an independent non-profit was deemed not worth the benefits, and in 2016 the members voted to join Software in the Public Interest (SPI). Joining SPI made a lot of sense; primarily, it would relieve X.org of administrative burdens while preserving the benefits of non-profit status. The costs of being in SPI are offset by the savings of not having to pay the various fees required to upkeep the […]

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  • July 13, 2017 - Thibault Saunier

    GStreamer to Gain the First RTSP 2.0 Implementation!

    Real Time Stream Protocol 2.0 The RTSP 2.0 was proposed in December 2016 to replace the 1.0 version of the standard; this new version is not backward compatible with the previous one. RTSP 1.0 is almost 20 years old, and it’s done a good job at defining a standard protocol for real time media streaming signaling, but it has not evolved much since then and had some issues that were worth fixing. The new version of this standard aims to resolve inconsistencies, clean up the RFC, add missing definitions, and restructure the document to reach better interoperability between implementers. RTSP 2.0 also comes with a bunch of new features (such as pipelined setup request, to avoid round trip time on initialization) and removes some features that were considered not useful enough (such as the RECORD command). GStreamer’s RSTP 2.0 Implementation At Samsung, we decided it was the right time to […]

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  • June 13, 2017 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    The Business Value of Open Source Software

    This article is part of the comprehensive guide to open source for business. The previous article in this series covered the technical reasons for why OSS is often better than proprietary software. This article will explore how OSS can benefit a business from a non-technical perspective. Open Source Development Reduces Costs One of the major reasons more companies are adopting OSS is because it is a very effective way to reduce development costs. The two primary ways open source reduces development costs is by simplifying software licensing and increasing development speed. Simplifies Licensing Initially, the most obvious place OSS reduces costs is through the complete lack of licensing costs. Proprietary software typically includes initial licensing costs and ongoing maintenance contracts that can be a significant portion of the initial costs; these are often unavoidable. OSS licenses grant free use, modification, and distribution rights to everyone, meaning there is no initial […]

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  • The Tizen Developer Conference (TDC) is just around the corner; it will be held May 16 – 17 at the Hilton Union Square Hotel in San Francisco, CA. Our team contributes a ton of code to some of the critical open source software that makes up Tizen, so of course we’ll be spending some time there to network with app developers and device makers who work with Tizen. What’s Happening with Tizen? There has been quite a few exciting developments for Tizen over the last year; for starters Samsung joined forces with Microsoft to bring .NET to Tizen, allowing developers to build applications for Tizen using C# and Visual Studio. Additionally, Tizen has continued to show up on a growing number of consumer devices including the Gear S3, Z2,  Gear 360, AR9500M air conditioner, POWERbot VR7000, multiple smart TV’s, and more. Finally, Tizen RT was released last year, making it […]

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  • April 10, 2017 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    What Does the Samsung OSG Do?

    In case you haven’t heard the news, we’re currently on a quest to hire a new Linux Kernel engineer, so we thought this would be a good time to explain what our team does for Samsung. Samsung relies on open source software for the vast majority of products and services the company produces and as a result, it has become an imperative for the company to have a team dedicated to improving and leveraging open source software. Essentially, the OSG has two primary purposes. The first is to provide open source leadership within Samsung by helping other divisions in the company understand how to participate in and benefit from open source development. The second is to serve as Samsung’s representatives in the wider open source community. The mandate of this team is to focus on enhancing key open source projects and technologies via active contributions to them, and to be […]

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  • March 27, 2017 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    The Technical Value of Open Source Software

    This article is part of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. Technical value is one of the most important traits of software development and engineering. A mature open source community will often have multiple companies, organizations, and individuals who contribute to and depend on the code base. Any groups that depend on the code are invested in the future of the code, making it much less likely for the code to disappear while simultaneously encouraging participants to play an active role in ensuring proper bug and security fixing processes. This article will explore the ways open source software can benefit a business from a technical perspective by offering improved code stability and greater control over the software stack. Open Source Improves Code Stability Software built by a proprietary component provider can typically only be fixed by employees of the vendor company. In an open source community, anyone can test or fix […]

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  • If you’re reading this blog, you’re probably among the growing number of software professionals who understand how valuable open source development is to the production of modern technology. Many of us have seen how open source can reduce costs, increase development speed, increase overall product quality and more, but it can often be challenging to quantify the value of this using understandable metrics. Fortunately for us, open source development happens in public so a lot of information can be extracted from public resources such as git repository logs, email mailing lists, code review and bug tracking platforms, and more. One relatively new and useful tool to aide in this is GrimoireLab from Bitergia. We’ve spent the last few months exploring the capabilities of this tool to find out what kind of metrics we can use to track the success of the efforts of the Samsung Open Source Group. Doing so […]

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  • November 22, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Check Out the Free Open Source Compliance Handbook

    Open source compliance is often overlooked, but is a critical component of a successful open source software strategy. If your company is going to use or contribute to open source software, failure to comply with the software licenses can lead to costly cleanup efforts, or even lawsuits if license violations are found. To mitigate these risks, it’s important to establish an internal organizational program that manages compliance with open source licenses. For many companies, open source compliance is often the first major step into open source engineering, so it’s vital to establish proper organizations and procedures that build a foundation for continual success. That’s why Ibrahim Haddad joined forces with the Linux Foundation to create Open Source Compliance in the Enterprise, and released it as a free handbook to download. This book covers the essentials of establishing a successful open source compliance strategy in an enterprise setting, including the structure […]

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  • After finishing high school, I was destined to continue my academic life studying one of the fine arts I always loved: Architecture. I took special art classes to get prepared to study it, and so I did; I entered the architectural school at my hometown in the Canary Islands. In their first year, all students learn about the Bauhaus school and their impact. I knew about them, but in that year I learned about their philosophy in detail and I became sanely obsessed with their work. During their difficult social/political time, Bauhaus revolutionized the world of architecture, design, and art. Their modernist designs were centered in functionality, simplicity, rationality, and taking art to everybody through mass production. In summary, making our day to day habitats and tools better, cheaper, simpler, and available to all. So through most of my first year I asked myself “Where is the present-day Bauhaus?” I […]

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  • October 25, 2016 - Reynaldo Verdejo

    The 2016 GStreamer Hackfest & Conference in Berlin

    A few days ago, while on my way back from the GStreamer hackfest and conference combo, I tried to come up with a list of pearls to share here and arrived at a pretty troubling conclusion: there was no easy way to do so. The Hackfest I met Luis (De Bethencourt) a kilometer away from my hotel on a cold Saturday morning on October 8th. By then, I had already figured the only exercise I’d be able to get during my short 4-day stay in Berlin was going to be related to my commute, so I decided to embrace walking. We headed for C-Base as soon as we meet at his hotel’s lobby and arrived 10 minutes later to meet the typical familiar faces from the GStreamer community. So did everything start. The GStreamer developer community, while quite compact, has a surprisingly large number of regulars; people tend to stay around. This is something you hardly […]

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