Category: Leadership

  • You probably saw the announcement on October 10, 2016 that the Open Connectivity Foundation and the AllSeen Alliance will merge and create a ‘best of both’ IoT framework. To recap briefly, the Board of Directors from both organizations have agreed to consolidate operations under the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), while the open source projects will continue to be hosted at the Linux Foundation. I’ve noticed some confusion about what exactly happened, so I thought I would clarify some things in this article. To start, OCF and the AllSeen Alliance are each non-profit entities that are responsible for the business operations of each project. In addition, OCF hosts development of the specification. Each organization has their own bylaws, membership agreement, IPR policy, and charter. By law they must be governed by a board of directors, which consists of representatives from member organizations. One of the major differences between the two is that […]

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  • The past week or so has seen a significant amount of progress in the gadget backend of Enlightenment, due in no small part to the constant poking and prodding from Stephen Houston: our newest Samsung OSG Intern. As he mentioned in his post, we’ve known each other for quite some time now, so mentoring him has allowed both of us to skip over most of the pleasantries and get down to the code. Establishing a Mutually-Beneficial Partnership This type of internship is certainly new to me; seldom do I get the opportunity to sponsor and mentor a member of the community who has already been a contributor for such a long time. Given that I’d been the only one to use the new gadget API released in Enlightenment v21, I was curious to see what others would think after spending some time developing on top of it; soliciting feedback on […]

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  • September 16, 2016 - Mike Blumenkrantz

    Announcing the Samsung Open Source Group Internship Program

    Today, I’m switching gears from my usual technical posts to introduce a new initiative that we’re rolling out at the Open Source Group: the OSG Internship Program. Since the start of our team in 2013 we’ve been involved in a number of projects in different areas of the open source ecosystem. In the process we’ve come across a number of great community members, but we’ve also realized that our team isn’t large enough to tackle all of the technical challenges that we’re facing in the open source projects we work on. At Samsung, we greatly appreciate the collaborative nature of our relationship with these communities, and all the more so since many long-term contributors are hobbyists and students. Our appreciation runs deep for contributors who are working in these communities on their own time, particularly those who work collaboratively with us as we are preparing for future products. From time […]

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  • Consistency is everything. If launching open source projects is part of your job, it is incredibly helpful to have a clear, consistent, and repeatable process for open sourcing code and building a project. Why? There are a few reasons. For one, it increases your odds of success if you can identify the parts of the process that worked well before, and repeat them. Project launches are about people as much as technology. There are actions that attract others, and actions that drive others away; it’s beneficial to remember which is which. If you can’t convince others to join and use your project, you may as well just post the code and be done with it. Another major reason is time. I seriously doubt I’m alone in observing that the typical “We’re launching an OSS project next month! Um, where do we start?” emails usually come with little warning. Most of the time […]

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  • Open source communities can be vast, have an extremely fast rate of development, and have numerous companies and individuals who influence the project’s direction. Because of this diversity and speed it can be very easy for a company’s contributions to be lost in the shuffle, and it’s vital for any company that wants to contribute significant code upstream to establish themselves within the community. We’ve worked hard to establish a strong open source engineering team here at Samsung, and we’ve learned a lot about what it takes to be successful at this along the way. Without further ado, here are 10 tips to help you improve your company’s success at contributing code to the an open source community. Hire key developers and maintainers from the community. This is a critical step that allows you to gain skills and expertise. Two or three people from any given project are enough to […]

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  • May 13, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    10 Steps to Being Successful in Open Source

    No blog is complete without a simplistic numbered list of images, and we’re no exception! Open source methodology can be a complicated subject, but that doesn’t mean we can’t try to boil it down to some easily-digestible snippets. We’re proud to present the 10 simple steps it takes to be successful in open source. All of the images in this article were created by Ibrahim Haddad and are shared under CC-BY-SA-4.0, so feel free to use them in your own work. 1. Setup business infrastructure to support open source It is extremely challenging for a company to be successful in open source if they haven’t setup the proper infrastructure to allow their employees to interact with an open source community; this includes the establishment of both technical infrastructure as well as organizational infrastructure. You need to make sure your developers have the policies, processes, and tools that are required to […]

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  • March 18, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    An Introduction to the Open Source Development Model

    This article is part of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. If you are someone who is accustomed to working in a traditional, proprietary software development, the open source development model might challenge many of your perceptions about how code is produced in large scale software development projects. This is a result of a fundamental requirement of transparency and communication which results in a development process that is distributed, extremely fast, and modular. This article will explore how development occurs in an open source community. It will also explain how a typical open source community operates in order to provide context for how the actual development of code is carried out. General Community Practices Open source development is a highly collaborative process, and the only way for this to be successful is for all participants to make their technical motivations, intentions, and plans related to their participation visible […]

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  • February 17, 2016 - Brian Warner

    Contribute Upstream to Manage Technical Debt

    One of the things that you’ll find in the world of corporate open source is that we tend to talk a lot about money. This makes sense of course, since open source has had a significant and lasting financial impact on the economics of software development. At the same time it also provides a useful metaphor for why we do what we do. These days, the Leveraged Development Model is pretty well understood: We all put a bit of development into a project, and in return we get to reap benefits far greater than the value of our own contribution. This dynamic is the main driver behind the saying, “Software is eating the world, and open source is eating software.” At this point, it’s virtually impossible to deliver a software product on time and within budget without open source; this is all the more true when your competitors are actively […]

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  • January 15, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Common Characteristics of an Open Source Community

    This article is part of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. Open source communities are as complex as the diverse individuals that contribute to them, and there is no one-size-fits-all definition of how they operate. With that said, there are a lot of common fundamental practices and organizational strategies that many communities migrate towards. This article will provide a general definition of how open source communities are organized and operate in order to provide greater context for the rest of the guide. New definitions Open Source – Denotes software for which the original source code is made freely available and may be modified and redistributed. Upstream (noun) – The originating open source software project upon which a derivative is built. Maintainer (Committer) – An individual who is responsible for organizing code into source repositories, committing patches, and building the source code into binary packages for distribution. Community Organization […]

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  • January 7, 2016 - Samsung Open Source Group

    Spend Some Time With the Tizen Community at FOSDEM 2016

    For the 5th year in a row, the Tizen community will meet at FOSDEM: one of the most important free and open source software conferences in Europe. Members of the Tizen community from all over the world, including South Korea, Poland, UK, Bulgaria, and France will converge  on January 31 and February 1, 2016 at ULB Solbosch Campus, Brussels, Belgium. Here’s what you can expect from the Tizen community, this year: Meet Tizen developers from around the world for discussions. Interact with demos at the EFL/Tizen booth. Dine with Tizen developers at the community dinner. Learn and discover about free and open source software. Join Our Casual Dinner Meeting! If you are interested in Tizen presence at the conference, just bookmark Tizen’s wiki FOSDEM page and join us. There you will find details about latest news and plans including the Tizen community dinner that will occur on the evening of […]

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