Category: Leadership

  • OSCON is one of the leading conferences in the open source world, and it attracts thousands of visitors every year to Portland, OR. This year’s event wrapped up on Friday, July 24, and the Samsung Open Source Group sent about a dozen representatives to the conference this year to present talks, interact with visitors, and staff a large booth that featured demos of a handful of the open source projects we are involved with. We’re still a pretty small group here at Samsung with less than 50 people scattered throughout the world, so it’s important to us that we raise awareness about the work we do and OSCON is a good opportunity for us to do so. Scratching Our Itches In true open source fashion, Samsung went to OSCON in order to scratch the company’s own itches. In other words, like most companies and organizations, we were there to help […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: July 25 – 31, 2015 Open Source Continues to be Valuable to Large Enterprises Wipro recently commissioned The Open Source Era: a study from Oxford Economics to provide insight into the future of open source usage in large enterprises. The study surveyed C-level executives and people that report directly to c-level executives from a wide range of industries including financial services, retail and consumer products, healthcare, and government. Here are some notable findings from the study: 52% of respondents say open source is already supporting development of new products and services. 63% of respondents say open source will be critical to agility over the next three years 75% of respondents report problems integrating open source with existing systems. 56% of respondents report problems with a lack of talent for meeting technology goals. These numbers show that despite the widespread success of open source in large enterprises, […]

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  • June 29, 2015 - Jon A. Cruz

    How to Make Software Testing Work for You

    Testing is a vital aspect of the software development process. Most software developers should already know this, but if you find yourself working with people who disagree, it might be time to step back and take stock of the situation. Being familiar with common terminology is a good first step (if this topic is new to you, I advise you to read that article), but decisions about the details of testing implementation can often get tricky. The first among these decisions is deciding when it’s necessary to test. Is it Time to Test? For developers, this question has a simple answer: Yes. If you are coding, you should be testing. Between unit testing and system/integration testing, most development phases should be covered by some sort of test. Different phases might involve different types of testing, but some form of testing should be going on throughout. With that said, everything that […]

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  • June 24, 2015 - Sanjeev BA and Guy Martin

    Open Source + Academia: The Stanford CS210 Story

    The archer learns when he forgets all about the rules of the way of the bow and goes on to act entirely on instinct. In order, though, to be able to forget the rules, it is necessary to respect them and to know them. — Paul O. Coelho – The Way of the Bow This quote aptly applies to students making the transition from academia to the corporate world, as they get ready to apply their skills and knowledge to meet the ever-changing demands of businesses. The Linux Foundation has observed that these businesses are increasingly depending on open source. The academic community contributes a lot in terms of code, documentation, and research to open source projects and helps bring forward core innovations for mainstream adoption. In recent years, encouraging students to contribute to open source projects has increasingly been adopted as one of the best ways to prepare them for their careers ahead.  It also […]

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  • Entering any technical field is very challenging and requires a high amount of commitment, passion and grit to be successful. Yet, the work is highly rewarding and fulfilling, which makes the payoff completely worth the effort. In this article, I will share my journey into the highly technical software engineering/open source field as a woman, explaining how I stayed focused and motivated to find my way into vital software projects and endeavors.  My hope is that my story can inspire others who may be unsure whether they should take on this challenge to go for it! My Choice to Launch an Engineering Career Every career has a beginning, and mine started with the conscious decision to become an engineer when I was young. I loved math, physics and chemistry, and I tended to gravitate toward analytical and logical pursuits. There were some doubters and detractors, including my grandfather who said […]

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  • June 8, 2015 - Luis de Bethencourt

    Getting Things Done at the 2015 GStreamer Hackfest

    Over the weekend of March 13-15th, the Samsung Open Source Group office in Staines-upon-Thames, UK, hosted 34 developers of the GStreamer  project for a hackfest. GStreamer is a library for constructing graphs of media-handling components, and its uses range from simple music file playback and audio/video streaming to complex audio mixing and video processing. A lot of familiar faces showed up, as well as an unusual number of new people, and it was a very productive hackfest. While everybody hammered away on laptops, we worked on and discussed a variety of topics related to both the framework and applications. Discussions to Be Had… Some of the discussions that took place on the framework side included: How to move forward with the DASH common encryption – Patches have been sitting in Bugzilla for this for a while. An agreement was reached on how to simplify things and make them more generic so its possible […]

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  • Open Source Weekly Wrap Up: May 9 -15 2015 2015 Future of Open Source Study For the last 15 years, North Bridge and Black Duck Software have joined efforts every year to conduct a survey about the use of open source in modern business. A record 1,300 people responded to the survey this year, up from 822 in 2013. Respondents included software engineers, CIOs, CEOs, educators, analysts, and more. There is little that has changed in open source trends, and this survey demonstrates the continued pervasive expansion of open source. Here are some notable findings from this year’s survey: Enterprise Use/Participation 78% of companies run on open source, and less than 3% don’t use FOSS at all. 64% of respondents said their company currently participates in open source projects, up 14% YOY. 88% expect their companies to increase open source contributions, up from 56% last year. 66% consider OSS to […]

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  • We’re approaching (in a few months) the 24th anniversary of the famous email that Linus Torvalds (then an anonymous college student) sent to the world announcing his ‘hobby’ operating system (Linux). A lot has changed since that email, and while Linus still maintains ultimate veto power over what goes into the Linux Kernel, the fundamental tenet of letting go of a portion of the control over his project to gain the advantages of mass collaboration remains. This is at the core of all open source projects, and even in 2015 it seems to be a lesson that some people in Corporate America still haven’t fully grasped. The good news is that pretty much every industry has recognized the huge value of consuming open source, whether it be for internal use in their enterprise infrastructure, or as the basis for successful product lines. However, there is still widespread corporate reluctance to […]

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  • April 20, 2015 - Gurj Bahia

    Samsung Open Source Meets Europe

    A warm welcome from Europe! As Guy mentioned in his post, the Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) started in early 2013. Since then, the group has grown significantly and now has teams spread out over the whole world. In this post, I’ll focus on the OSG European office and leave the others (USA, Korea and India) for another time. Our European team has approximately 20 members with some of them located at the Samsung Research UK office in Staines-upon-Thames, within the M25 belt west of London. The rest of the team works either from their home offices or as part of an Samsung Open Source Group Lab at Szeged University in Hungary. The remote setup is a good example of how the OSG is changing Samsung’s internal culture, in addition to our external open source contributions. The goals of the OSG teams are the same in all branches. We aim […]

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  • Welcome everyone, to this, the new Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) blog! We’re glad you’re here, and we’re excited to show you what our team has been up to in the first two years of our existence, as well as what we’re working on going forward… But first, a little background… In 2012, Samsung leadership realized their consumption of Open Source software to help develop their products was increasing at a rapid pace.  Also, since most of the company’s developers were focused on product development, there was a lack of sufficient upstream contributions to give the company enough technical equity to influence the strategic direction of these key open source projects. Enter Ibrahim Haddad, formerly of the Linux Foundation, who was hired in early 2013 to start the Samsung Open Source Group, and charged with hiring strong open source talent in several key technology areas (system, web, multimedia, graphics, and […]

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