Category: Linux

  • August 2, 2017 - Bryce Harrington

    Better Attachment Handling with Mutt

    The Mutt email client is famed for its extensive configuration options, but since it’s text-based, certain things are more challenging to do when compared to its graphical brethren. Viewing attachments is one such annoyance; fortunately, as with most things, Mutt is extensively configurable! By default, Mutt does fine with most plain text documents, and depending on your installation may also handle HTML documents in some fashion. Attachments that Mutt doesn’t recognize can of course be downloaded and viewed manually, but we can do better. To tell Mutt that it should handle a new attachment type, or its “MIME type”, we associate it with Mutt’s “auto_view” parameter. For example, add this to your ~/.muttrc (and restart Mutt):

    Note: if you plan to add a number of file types, you may wish to put these in their own config file (e.g. ~/.mutt/auto-views), and include a line in ~/.muttrc like the following: […]

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  • July 28, 2017 - Shuah Khan

    Kselftest for Linux 4.13 to Include TAP13

    Linux 4.13-rc1 was released on July 15th 2017  and it includes enhancements to the Kselftest framework to support The Test Anything Protocol v13 (TAP13). TAP13 defines a human friendly output format for tests. Kselftest is run in test rings and is widely used for Linux kernel stable release regression testing. It’s important to make it easier to identify run-to-run differences; TAP13 adaption makes it easier to understand the test results, and helps pin point differences between one run to another run of the test suite. Credit goes to Tim Bird for recommending TAP13 as a suitable format, and to Greg KH for kick starting the work with help from Paul Elder and Alice Ferrazzi. The first phase of the TAP13 conversion is included in Linux 4.13. Future releases will include updates to rest of the tests. The following shows membarrier test results before and after TAP 13 conversion: Before:

    After: […]

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  • July 18, 2017 - Bryce Harrington

    Introduction to GPG Encryption and git-crypt

    While Open Source prides itself on open transparency, there are certain things that must be kept secret like team credentials or personal information.  GNU’s OpenPGP (GPG) encryption tool set coupled with git-crypt can be invaluable for sharing such information privately with colleagues. For people unfamiliar with GPG it can seem a bit intimidating to start with, but it needn’t be! This article is a step-by-step introduction to getting set up with your own GPG key. Install GPG Since GPG has become pretty ubiquitous it should be straightforward to install via the usual method for your operating system. debian/ubuntu:

    OSX (using ports):

    etc. Create Your Own GPG Key Easy enough! The following command will ask for the info needed to make the key. Pick RSA with a key length of 4096 bits, and be very careful to set a unique GPG password that you’re not using anywhere else (but pick one you can remember!):

    […]

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  • As you might already know, many open source projects are moving away from autotools as a build system and are embracing Meson. GStreamer was one of the first projects to initiate this move as the community pushed for it to happen. Meson has many advantages over autotools, but one I would like to talk about in this post is the notion of subprojects, which Meson introduces. Basically, thanks to this it’s easy to build several projects as if it was one; GStreamer has many components that were formerly independent in the build system, meaning that if you wanted to build the latest version of, say, gst-plugins-bad, you also needed to build GStreamer core and GStreamer base one way or another. Previously, we had some scripts to help with this process, but it was still necessary to clone and build everything separately and handle interdependency between things manually. Today, things are different when using […]

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  • Wayland: there have been many blog posts, articles, and news items about the new Linux display protocol. There have been developers working to extend the protocol for new and extremely helpful use cases, but new frontiers continue to be explored: putting a multiseat Wayland compositor into a toolkit widget. Due to Wayland’s philosophy of “build your own compositor,” there is no de-facto implementation of a Wayland display server that is analogous to Xorg for X11. Wayland implementations are written using the libwayland server API, and this is flexible enough to be used even in the case of a widget. Overall, the only noteworthy difference between putting a compositor in a widget and a normal nested compositor is that the output size is set to the size of the widget instead of the size of the window. With this in mind, a compositor widget can be manipulated just like any other […]

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  • The Tizen Developer Conference (TDC) is just around the corner; it will be held May 16 – 17 at the Hilton Union Square Hotel in San Francisco, CA. Our team contributes a ton of code to some of the critical open source software that makes up Tizen, so of course we’ll be spending some time there to network with app developers and device makers who work with Tizen. What’s Happening with Tizen? There has been quite a few exciting developments for Tizen over the last year; for starters Samsung joined forces with Microsoft to bring .NET to Tizen, allowing developers to build applications for Tizen using C# and Visual Studio. Additionally, Tizen has continued to show up on a growing number of consumer devices including the Gear S3, Z2,  Gear 360, AR9500M air conditioner, POWERbot VR7000, multiple smart TV’s, and more. Finally, Tizen RT was released last year, making it […]

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  • After my previous blog post, you should now be using SSH and Tor all the more often, but things are probably slow when you are trying to setup a secure connection with this method. This may well be due to your computer lacking a proper source of entropy to create secure cryptographic keys. You can check the entropy of your system with the following command.

    This will return a number, hopefully it’s above 3,000 because that’s what is likely needed to keep up with your needs. So what do you do if it’s not high enough? This article will cover two tips to improve your computer’s entropy. All examples in this guide are for Linux distributions that use systemd. rngd rngd is a tool designed to feed the system with more entropy from various sources. It is part of the rng-tools package. After installing it, the rngd service needs to […]

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  • April 7, 2017 - Phil Coval and Sanjeev BA

    How OCF is Creating the Connected Car

    The Connected Car & Fragmentation Traditional car manufacturers have begun including early iterations of touchscreen technology with access to media and apps that can also provide basic HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and A/C) controls for the vehicle. These features can often be accessed through mobile devices with tailor-made apps from each car maker. However, this has led to OEMs building their own ecosystem silos, similar to the trends observed in the smartphone industry. The lack of an open, standardized framework has resulted in a fragmented market, where experiences from one OEM won’t work with another in any streamlined way; consequently, developers aren’t thinking about how to provide a rich user experience that allows cars and drivers to work in unison; this is a huge missed opportunity. Samsung OSG, OCF, and IoTivity The Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) is creating a specification and sponsoring the IoTivity open source project to deliver an open and secure connectivity and […]

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  • A V4L2 staging driver for the Raspberry Pi (RPi) was recently merged into the Linux kernel 4.11. While this driver is currently under development, I wanted to test it and to provide help with V4L2-related issues. So, I took some time to build an upstream kernel for the Raspberry Pi 3 with V4L2 enabled. This isn’t a complex process, but it requires some tricks for it to work; this article describes the process. Prepare an Upstream Kernel The first step is to prepare an upstream kernel by cloning a git tree from the kernel repositories. Since the Broadcom 2835 camera driver (bcm2835-v4l2) is currently under staging, it’s best to clone the staging tree because it contains the staging/vc04_services directory with both ALSA and V4L2 drivers:

    There’s an extra patch that it is required for DT to work with the bcm2835-v4l2 driver:

    You need to apply this to the git tree, in order for the vciq […]

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  • February 22, 2017 - Javier Martinez Canillas

    Samsung OSG Contributions to Linux Kernel 4.10

    Linux 4.10 was released on February 17; for this release, 6 engineers from the US and UK branches of the Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) contributed 341 patches that modified 44,709 lines of code. Again, most of the changes comes from Mauro Carvalho Chehab’s work to improve the Linux kernel documentation and fixing bugs all over the media tree. The following is a list of the OSG engineers that contributed to this release and the number of changesets and lines of code, as reported by Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman’s gitdm tool. OSG developers by changesets Mauro Carvalho Chehab 231 67.7% Javier Martinez Canillas 77 22.6% Stefan Schmidt 11 3.2% Shuah Khan 11 3.2% Luis de Bethencourt 10 2.9% Derek Foreman 1 0.3% OSG developers by changed lines Mauro Carvalho Chehab 44,120 98.7% Luis de Bethencourt 162 0.4% Javier Martinez Canillas 156 0.3% Stefan Schmidt 145 0.3% Shuah Khan 92 0.2% Derek […]

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