Category: Linux

  • Open Source Wrap Up: June 27 – July 2, 2015 Linux Foundation Announces R Consortium The Linux Foundation (LF) has announced the launch of the R Consortium, a collaborative project aimed at strengthening the technical and user communities of the R programming language. R is an open source programming language used by statisticians and data scientists to extract value from data, and it is used by millions of researchers around the world. This is the newest collaborative project of the many that have been launched by the LF, which all focus on the promotion and development of their respective communities. To learn more about the R Consortium, visit the project website. Tizen 3.0 Common 2015.Q2 is Released The Tizen community has announced the release of Tizen 3.0 Common 2015.Q2. This release features a number of upgrades and improvements; most notably, major changes have been made to system security. The Crosswalk […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up June 20 – 26, 2015 The Open Container Project is Launched The Linux Foundation has announced the launch of a new industry partnership called the Open Container Project (OCP). In recent years, Docker has led a rapid expansion of Linux containers with their popular platform that has focused on providing a common platform for an incredible range of IT tools.  OCP will continue to build upon this by using code that has been donated by Docker Inc. to create a platform that adheres to the following guidelines: not be bound to higher level constructs such as a particular client or orchestration stack not be tightly associated with any particular commercial vendor or project and be portable across a wide variety of operating systems, hardware, CPU architectures, public clouds, etc. The goal is to set common, minimal standards around container technology, and the project includes companies that […]

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  • June 22, 2015 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    An Introduction to Tizen 2.3 Application Architecture

    Tizen’s architecture is designed to be equally friendly to web developers and embedded systems developers alike, and its flexible nature encourages its use on an array of devices including TV’s, smart phones, watches, tablets, In-Vehicle Infotainment, and smart appliances. It does this by providing a Web API that allows app developers to create simple programs using only HTML/CSS/JavaScript, and also a Native API that provides the benefits of building software for embedded systems in C and C++. The current version of Tizen being used in consumer products is 2.3, and this is the version you will most likely want to target if you are an app developer. This article will cover how Tizen applications are setup and how the Tizen Native and Web APIs work. Tizen Application Types There are three primary types of apps that can be built in Tizen: Native Application – Applications that are developed similar to […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up June 13 – 19, 2015 Let’s Encrypt Announces Launch Schedule Let’s encrypt is a Linux Foundation collaborative project that seeks to provide a free, automated, and open certificate authority to allow anyone to securely encrypt their website using HTTPS. Setting this service up will be as simple as running two commands on the Linux server that runs the site, simplifying the process of generating trusted certificates significantly. The project has announced their launch schedule for early testing of the service as well as general availability. The first certificates will be issued the week of July 27, 2015 and will gradually scale up to a general release the week of September 14, 2015. OIC Plugfest #2 Scheduled for End of June in Redmond, Washington The Open Interconnect Consortium will host its second interoperability plugfest June 23, 24 and 25th at VMC, Inc. in Redmond Washington. This three-day […]

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  • June 17, 2015 - Tilmann Scheller

    A Conclusion to Accelerating Your Build with Clang

    This is the second part of a series that explores improving the build process using Clang. This post will take a look at the remaining methods for speeding up the build and will conclude with an overall summary of the improved speeds. To read an introduction to this experiment as well as the build system we are using, take a look at part one of this series. Here is our list of ideas again: Generic: Build with Clang rather than GCC Use a faster linker, such as GNU gold Optimize our host compiler binary aggressively (LTO, PGO, LTO+PGO) Move parts of the debug info into separate files: split DWARF Use Ninja rather than GNU make in CMake-based projects Cache object files with ccache Use a shared library build instead of a static build for incremental debug builds Clang/LLVM-specific: Optimize TableGen for debug builds Build less: e.g. build only the backends we […]

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  • Building software is a time-consuming task, especially if you are working on large codebases such as Clang and LLVM (2.5M C++ lines combined). As an LLVM developer, a significant portion of my time is spent building the software because a clean build take several minutes to complete. The work outlined in this series started out as an experiment to see by how much we could speed up the build process by using different tools or build settings rather than simply upgrading our hardware, and the goal is to squeeze as much performance out of the toolchain as possible. The focus is on building Clang/LLVM, however most of the results and corresponding suggestions will apply to other large C++ projects as well, and this post expands on a lightning talk I recently gave at the EuroLLVM 2015 conference. Taking a Look at the Options So what can we actually do to speed up […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up June 6 – 12, 2015 LinkedIn Releases Pinot: An Open Source, Real-Time, Business Analytics Platform Pinot has been the de-facto analytics program used by LinkedIn for more than two years to provide insight to information like profile views, company follow analytics and A/B testing analytics. The program provides an OLAP datastore that emphasizes scalability, low latency, data freshness, and high availability. It uses data from Hadoop and Kafka, and provides an SQL-like query language that includes functionality such as: filtering, aggregation, group by, order by, and distinct entries. The source code can be acquired on GitHub, and the project wiki has detailed information about why and how you might want to use this software. Read more at the LinkedIn Engineering blog. Wayland Gets a License Fix A problem with Wayland’s license was recently uncovered when a Wikipedia editor pointed out a discrepancy between the license statement […]

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  • Entering any technical field is very challenging and requires a high amount of commitment, passion and grit to be successful. Yet, the work is highly rewarding and fulfilling, which makes the payoff completely worth the effort. In this article, I will share my journey into the highly technical software engineering/open source field as a woman, explaining how I stayed focused and motivated to find my way into vital software projects and endeavors.  My hope is that my story can inspire others who may be unsure whether they should take on this challenge to go for it! My Choice to Launch an Engineering Career Every career has a beginning, and mine started with the conscious decision to become an engineer when I was young. I loved math, physics and chemistry, and I tended to gravitate toward analytical and logical pursuits. There were some doubters and detractors, including my grandfather who said […]

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  • Open Source Wrap Up: May 20 – June 5, 2014 Automotive Grade Linux Released Automotive Grade Linux (AGL) is a collaborative environment to bring a Linux software stack to the connected car. The project has released its own open source In-Vehicle Infotainment (IVI) software that features a dashboard, home screen, navigation map, media playback, audio controls, and more. Each feature also includes detailed design requirement documents with descriptions, use cases, graphical assets, and architecture diagrams, all available on the project wiki. Moving forward, the project will focus on developing standardized instruments clusters in an effort to expand the role of AGL into more aspects of the car ecosystem as a part of the push towards autonomous cars. Read more from the Linux Foundation. Fedora 22 Released Fedora 22, the latest version of a popular Linux distribution that’s backed by Red Hat, has been released. It includes quite a few improvements, […]

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  • There are many companies shipping products based on ARMv8 today, including AMD, Samsung, NVIDIA, Cavium, Apple, Broadcom, Qualcomm, Huawei, and others.  What makes ARM unique is the differentiation between vendors; while a majority of features are based on the ARM reference processor and bus architectures, additional custom features may be introduced or reference features may be omitted at the vendor’s discretion. This results in various profiles that are tailored to specific products, making it extremely difficult for another architecture to compete against such a wide selection of choices. As ARMv8 matures, it’s moving out of mobile and embedded devices into Industrial IoT (Internet of Things), network routers, wireless infrastructure, and eventually, the cloud. For those of you not familiar with KVM, it stands for Kernel Virtual Machine. It’s a Linux Kernel hypervisor module. KVM is the primary open-source-based hypervisor, and is the default for Openstack, a popular cloud computing software […]

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