Category: Tizen

  • While there are some developers who are familiar with using Ecore_Evas to create a canvas for applications, we often find that new EFL users face some confusion when first trying to create an application. This article aims to provide a simple example of how to create your first EFL Wayland application. For those not familiar with the Ecore_Evas library, it is a set of functions that make it easy to tie together Ecore’s main loop and input handling to Evas; as such, it’s a natural base for EFL applications. While this combination makes it easy to create the basic aspects all applications need, for normal applications (those that use buttons, checkboxes and layouts) one should consider using Elementary. Ecore_Evas is extremely well suited for applications that are not based on widgets. It has a main loop that delivers events, does basic window handling, and leaves all of the drawing up […]

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  • A curious mind recently asked me to share materials about the OCF SmartHome demo, or perhaps I should call it the “Minimalist Smart Switch” instead. The demo was displayed at the Embedded Linux Conference in Berlin, and featured IoTivity running on an ARTIK10 SoC that connected to a Tizen Gear S2 Smartwatch; both run Tizen OS. You will find more technical details in the following slide deck. IoTivity Tutorial: Prototyping IoT Devices on GNU/Linux from Samsung Open Source Group Install Tizen and IoTivity If you want to run it this demo, you can download the system image and uncompress the archive directly to the SD card using QEMU tools.

    Once this is completed, insert the SD card into the ARTIK10 and turn it on; it will boot Tizen and launch the IoTivity server. For more information about this, check out the previous blog posts about booting tizen on ARTIK and […]

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  • November 4, 2016 - Chris Michael

    Ecore_Wl2: An EFL Library for Wayland Applications

    Throughout the years of developing Wayland support for EFL, few EFL libraries have had as much impact on EFL Wayland applications as the Ecore_Wayland library has. This library was one of the first to make it possible to truly run EFL applications in a Wayland environment. As the years progressed, it became apparent that Ecore_Wayland had some shortcomings; this blog post will introduce you to the replacement for Ecore_Wayland, called Ecore_Wl2. Ecore_Wayland’s Shortcomings While testing our first Wayland implementation, it became apparent that the initial implementation of the Ecore_Wayland library had some drawbacks. Publicly exposed structures could not be changed easily without breaking existing applications, and any changes to existing Wayland protocols would require significant changes to our Ecore_Wayland library. It was also discovered that when an EFL Wayland application creates a new window, the backend library also creates an entirely new display and connection to the Wayland server. This […]

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  • October 26, 2016 - Chris Michael

    Ecore_Drm2: How to Use Atomic Modesetting

    In a previous article, I briefly discussed how the Ecore_Drm2 library came into being. This article will expand on that article and provide a brief introduction to the Atomic Modesetting and Nuclear Pageflip features inside the new Ecore_Drm2 library. What Makes Atomic Modesetting and Nuclear Pageflip so Great? For those that are unaware of what “modesetting” is, you may read more about it here. Atomic Modesetting is a feature that allows for output modes (resolutions, refresh rate, etc) to be tested in advance on a single screen or on multiple outputs. A benefit of this feature is that the given mode may be tested prior to being applied. If the test of a given output mode fails, the screen image doesn’t need to be changed to confirm a given mode works or not, thus reducing screen flickering. Atomic/Nuclear Pageflipping allows for a given scanout framebuffer object and/or one or more hardware […]

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  • October 7, 2016 - Chris Michael

    Introducing the New & Improved Ecore_Drm2 Library

    In the early days of developing Wayland support in EFL/Enlightenment, it was quickly apparent that EFL would need an abstraction library to interface with libdrm. We wanted users of EFL to be able to call simple functions without having to know about the underlying internals of libdrm, thus the original Ecore_Drm library was born. First, efforts to develop this library were undertaken with much enthusiasm and little fan-fare. After the birth of Ecore_Drm, we then proceeded to integrate it’s usage into some new Evas and Ecore_Evas engines so that the Enlightenment Desktop Shell could make use of it and render our first standalone Wayland desktop implementation. After kicking the tires of our Wayland desktop for a while, we came to realize some shortcomings of the existing Ecore_Drm implementation. For starters, it would create it’s own Ecore_Drm_Device structure when launching the Enlightenment Wayland desktop (this structure was a representation of the […]

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  • August 15, 2016 - Phil Coval

    An Introduction to Tizen Development on ARTIK

    This article is a direct follow up of my previous post about booting Tizen on the ARTIK10. Before starting, you should bookmark this wiki page as an entry point for Tizen on ARTIK devices. At the 2015 Tizen Developer Conference, I had the opportunity to present a tutorial about Tizen platform development; it’s still valid today. This article is very similar but is adapted for ARTIK10 and ARTIK5 configuration. For some context, check out to the following slide deck along with the recorded video on how to patch Tizen and build with GBS for x86a as well as this page about Tizen:Common on VMware. tdc2015-strategy-devel-20150916 from Phil C Tools Setup If you’re familiar with Tizen you probably know about Git Build System (GBS): a very convenient tool to build packages. It’s adapted from Debian’s git-build-package to support zypper repos. First, gbs and some other Tizen tools need to be installed […]

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  • August 3, 2016 - Phil Coval

    How to Boot Tizen on ARTIK

    The fact that Tizen can be run on ARTIK is not the latest breaking news, considering it was previously demonstrated live at the 2015 Tizen Conference. There, the ARTIK project was also explained as an IoT platform of choice. Since then, ARTIK has become a new Tizen reference device, so here are a couple of hints that will help you test upcoming Tizen release on this hardware. First let me point out that Tizen’s wiki has a special ARTIK category, where you’ll find ongoing documentation efforts, you’ll want to bookmark this page. In this article, I will provide a deeper explanation of how to use the bleeding edge version of Tizen:3.0:Common on ARTIK10, and how to start working on this platform. As explained in my previous Yocto/meta-artik article, I suggest you avoid using the eMMC for development purposes; for this article I will boot the ARTIK from an SDcard. In […]

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  • June 15, 2016 - Chris Michael

    Elput: A Libinput Abstraction for EFL

    Input is something generally taken for granted, but it’s not without issues. While working on a new EFL library for Direct Rendering, the community decided that having the same libinput code duplicated across multiple internal subsystems like Ecore_Fb, Ecore_Drm, etc. would be a great effort to maintain in the future. To reduce this effort, Elput was created. Introducing Elput Elput is a library designed to abstract all the gory details of using libinput, and it provides a central API that can be used to initialize, iterate, and manipulate various input devices found on a system. These can include keyboards, pointers, touch screens, and any other input device that libinput supports. Elput is also multi-seat aware, meaning that when a new input device gets attached to the system and belongs to a different seat, Elput will automatically create a new seat internally and do any setup required for that new input […]

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  • May 17, 2016 - Phil Coval and Sanjeev BA

    OSG, OCF, & An Automotive Fortnight!

    The Samsung Open Source Group is playing an active role in the promotion and adoption of IoT standards across multiple domains. Samsung understands the importance of openness and collaboration to realize the full potential of IoT. One of the key promises we’ve made,  is to be open and collaborative in our approach to delivering products and solutions to our customers. This was a core part of the Samsung strategy, as explained in the following video. Samsung has remain committed to this approach and continued to deliver on the promise, year after year. Based on these principles the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), a global consortium of leading companies (~170 and growing) focused on creating a standard for interoperable devices and services was founded in 2014. The OCF approach has three key deliverables: An Open Specification: Open Connectivity Foundation An Open Source Implementation: IoTivity A membership driven certification program:  OCF certification Through this approach, OCF has created […]

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  • February 23, 2016 - Phil Coval

    IoTivity is Getting Ready for Automotive

    Samsung has recently intensified its focus on improving the driving experience with the launch of Connect Auto. As a coincidence, I tried to put together different efforts from our group to into an open connected car experiment. Check out this video which shows a DIY Tizen fan that’s controlled from an Automotive Linux system and Tizen TM1 mobile device: It’s All About Interoperability It might look a bit over-engineered with all of the devices in this demonstration, but the purpose is to validate communication between devices on a network (WiFi, BT, BLE) in various contexts. Of course, it’s possible to adapt the DIY fan to use an automatic gate mechanism or something else to interact with the driver, or it could even use cloud services that ensure the necessary level of security. Interoperability is the key word here, I believe we’re headed in the right direction following the recent Open […]

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