• April 22, 2015 - Lars Bergstrom and Mike Blumenkrantz

    Servo: Building a High-Performance, Safe Web Browser

    Servo is a new web rendering engine that was launched by Mozilla in 2012 and is now receiving significant contributions from both Samsung and independent community members. Our goal is to produce an embeddable engine that can be used in both browsers and applications to make the web platform faster and safer, and bring it to more devices. We started this project to address fundamental limitations of current browser engines. First, the C family of programming languages doesn’t ensure safe use of memory, which leads to the majority of all zero-day browser security bugs. Second, current engines were originally designed for use on a PC, and are challenging to scale down to low memory and low power devices. Finally, as the web platform has evolved, the tightly-coupled design of current browser engines has made it difficult to provide performance guarantees, such as 60 fps screen updates. Memory Safety Investigations have […]

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  • April 20, 2015 - Gurj Bahia

    Samsung Open Source Meets Europe

    A warm welcome from Europe! As Guy mentioned in his post, the Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) started in early 2013. Since then, the group has grown significantly and now has teams spread out over the whole world. In this post, I’ll focus on the OSG European office and leave the others (USA, Korea and India) for another time. Our European team has approximately 20 members with some of them located at the Samsung Research UK office in Staines-upon-Thames, within the M25 belt west of London. The rest of the team works either from their home offices or as part of an Samsung Open Source Group Lab at Szeged University in Hungary. The remote setup is a good example of how the OSG is changing Samsung’s internal culture, in addition to our external open source contributions. The goals of the OSG teams are the same in all branches. We aim […]

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  • Tizen+RPI2

    April 18, 2015 - Mauro Carvalho Chehab

    Bringing Tizen to a Raspberry PI 2 Near You…

    The Raspberry Pi is the most popular single-board computer with more than 5 million sold. While there are numerous Linux Distributions that run on RPI including Raspbian, Pidora, Ubuntu, OSMC, and OpenElec, the Tizen OS does not currently run on it. Since Tizen is being positioned as an important player within the growing Internet of Things (IoT) ecosystem, providing a Raspberry PI 2 port can help developers gain more Tizen experience. For this reason, the Samsung Open Source group decided to work on such port. This article will go over how to build a bootable Tizen image for Raspberry Pi from a computer running Linux. The Raspberry Pi 2 has several advantages over the first version. Among them: It has a quad-core CPU It runs at 900 MHz It uses an ARM Cortex-A7 CPU The ARM Cortex-A7 CPU is very nice since most distributions are compiled to use the arm […]

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  • Welcome everyone, to this, the new Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) blog! We’re glad you’re here, and we’re excited to show you what our team has been up to in the first two years of our existence, as well as what we’re working on going forward… But first, a little background… In 2012, Samsung leadership realized their consumption of Open Source software to help develop their products was increasing at a rapid pace.  Also, since most of the company’s developers were focused on product development, there was a lack of sufficient upstream contributions to give the company enough technical equity to influence the strategic direction of these key open source projects. Enter Ibrahim Haddad, formerly of the Linux Foundation, who was hired in early 2013 to start the Samsung Open Source Group, and charged with hiring strong open source talent in several key technology areas (system, web, multimedia, graphics, and […]

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  • - Bryce Harrington

    Custom Compose Keys on Ubuntu

    The Compose key is awesome, and I think Linux distributions should include this in all keyboard layouts by default. You’re probably thinking, “Wait, ‘Compose’?? There’s no key on my keyboard labeled ‘Compose’, what the heck is this guy talking about? And why would I need it, anyway?” I’m a mono-lingual USian. Now, I had a few years of German in high school but ach, nein, it really didn’t take. However, with today’s multicultural, globalized Internet, I’ve gained friends and colleagues from all over the globe with all sorts of odd foreign letters in their names, and I want to refer to them properly. Not too many years ago, this was a hard thing to do. The Internet communicated in so-called “plain text”, which consisted of just the basic English letters, numbers and symbols. This Internet alphabet was originally created and standardized by the Teletype industry, who named it the American […]

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  • April 9, 2015 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    We Run on Open Source

    Open source developers can create an immense amount of value for any company that relies on open source software by giving the company the ability to direct and influence aspects of the open source community. This allows the company to shape the tools they rely on, making them better fit their needs: a phenomenon otherwise known as “scratching their own itch.” While an open source developer’s primary skill is writing good code, their value extends far beyond technical skills. Adopting open source practices requires participation in diverse communities that have a number of stakeholders who each have their own itches to scratch.  Open source developers find themselves in a complex position that requires them to be experts not only in their technical field, but also in communication and collaboration. Open source development is a collaborative process that happens all over the world, and our group is no different with developers […]

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