• November 22, 2016 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Check Out the Free Open Source Compliance Handbook

    Open source compliance is often overlooked, but is a critical component of a successful open source software strategy. If your company is going to use or contribute to open source software, failure to comply with the software licenses can lead to costly cleanup efforts, or even lawsuits if license violations are found. To mitigate these risks, it’s important to establish an internal organizational program that manages compliance with open source licenses. For many companies, open source compliance is often the first major step into open source engineering, so it’s vital to establish proper organizations and procedures that build a foundation for continual success. That’s why Ibrahim Haddad joined forces with the Linux Foundation to create Open Source Compliance in the Enterprise, and released it as a free handbook to download. This book covers the essentials of establishing a successful open source compliance strategy in an enterprise setting, including the structure […]

    Read More
  • November 17, 2016 - Marcel Hollerbach

    An Introduction to Managing Enlightenment Widget Focus

    In Enlightenment, a widget can have focus, meaning that once a key on a keyboard is pressed the events will be delivered to the focused widget, and the widget can then react to the event. For example, a text field will start to append the letter ‘a’ once the appropriate key is hit on the keyboard; once the key is released, it will stop appending the characters. In other words, the focused widget is the widget that gets attention from input events. There can be several reasons for a widget to get focus, such as when a user clicks on it. But, there are also use cases where the user doesn’t have a touchscreen or mouse, such as on a TV, and needs to rely on a remote to control the focus on the screen. There are six directions that provide an optimal method for moving the focus around in […]

    Read More
  • Ibar has been Enlightenment’s primary launcher for at least a decade. What it lacked in features it gained in simplicity. However, as Enlightenment has grown, ibar has seemingly stayed stagnant. I wasn’t surprised when Mike Blumenkrantz informed me this would be one of the focuses of my internship. From the depths of Enlightenment’s growling, starving stomach, Luncher was born. In my previous post, I gave an introduction to developing gadgets for Enlightenment using the new gadget API; I did so by converting an existing module to the API, and this preparation was one of the first steps in creating Luncher. Mike and I spent weeks on end discussing ideas for Luncher including both necessary and wishlist features. We kicked around ideas and shared visuals of what we would like Luncher to be, and we identified weakness in ibar that must be improved for Luncher. In the end, we determined a […]

    Read More
  • After finishing high school, I was destined to continue my academic life studying one of the fine arts I always loved: Architecture. I took special art classes to get prepared to study it, and so I did; I entered the architectural school at my hometown in the Canary Islands. In their first year, all students learn about the Bauhaus school and their impact. I knew about them, but in that year I learned about their philosophy in detail and I became sanely obsessed with their work. During their difficult social/political time, Bauhaus revolutionized the world of architecture, design, and art. Their modernist designs were centered in functionality, simplicity, rationality, and taking art to everybody through mass production. In summary, making our day to day habitats and tools better, cheaper, simpler, and available to all. So through most of my first year I asked myself “Where is the present-day Bauhaus?” I […]

    Read More
  • November 9, 2016 - Michaël Bouchaud

    Samsung OSG Intern Profile: Michaël Bouchaud

    My name is Michaël Bouchaud, and over the years I’ve been a software developer with several companies; I’ve now become the most recent intern in the Samsung Open Source Group internship program. In this post, I’ll share my new activities, but first, I’ll introduce myself. How I Got My Start I’ve used Enlightenment since E16 was my desktop window manager while I was in high school. What attracted me to this environment the most is the fact that it’s lightweight and sits on the side of the interface, allowing it to be effective on both mobile and desktop. I was always a rather good math student, and I studied computer science, mathematics, physics and chemistry at university. At the end of my studies, I looked for work primarily in a Linux environment; the search was not easy, but I came across Substantiel, a little French company that works with Debian. It […]

    Read More
  • November 8, 2016 - Arun Raghavan

    GStreamer Media Synchronization Made Easy

    A lesser known, but particularly powerful feature of GStreamer is the ability to synchronize media playback across multiple devices with fairly good accuracy. However, with the way things stand right now, it requires some amount of fiddling and a reasonably thorough knowledge of GStreamer’s synchronization mechanisms. While we have had some excellent talks about these at previous GStreamer conferences, getting things to work is still a fair amount of effort for someone not well-versed with GStreamer. As part of my work with the Samsung OSG, I’ve been working on addressing this problem by wrapping all the complexity associated with this in a library. The intention is for anyone who wants to implement synchronized streaming between devices on the same network to be able to do so with a few lines of code and basic know-how of writing applications based on GStreamer. I’ve started work on this already, and you can […]

    Read More
  • November 4, 2016 - Chris Michael

    Ecore_Wl2: An EFL Library for Wayland Applications

    Throughout the years of developing Wayland support for EFL, few EFL libraries have had as much impact on EFL Wayland applications as the Ecore_Wayland library has. This library was one of the first to make it possible to truly run EFL applications in a Wayland environment. As the years progressed, it became apparent that Ecore_Wayland had some shortcomings; this blog post will introduce you to the replacement for Ecore_Wayland, called Ecore_Wl2. Ecore_Wayland’s Shortcomings While testing our first Wayland implementation, it became apparent that the initial implementation of the Ecore_Wayland library had some drawbacks. Publicly exposed structures could not be changed easily without breaking existing applications, and any changes to existing Wayland protocols would require significant changes to our Ecore_Wayland library. It was also discovered that when an EFL Wayland application creates a new window, the backend library also creates an entirely new display and connection to the Wayland server. This […]

    Read More
  • November 3, 2016 - Bryce Harrington

    Compose Key Support in Weston

    I recently added support to Weston for compose sequences via the configured compose key. This is now available in all of the Weston clients. What are “compose sequences”? Let’s say I need to write to someone named Zoë, but I don’t have an “ë” key on my keyboard. I can create the letter using separate key strokes:

    The first key, RAlt (the Alt key on the right side of the keyboard), is the compose key (also called the Multi-key). It signals that a compose sequence is beginning. The next key is double-quote, constructed by holding one of the Shift keys while pressing the single-quote key. Third we type the letter e. This completes the sequence. Or, more correctly, the system finds a match for this sequence in a table of available sequences, and thus considers it finished. The entry in the table indicates that the ‘ë’ symbol should be […]

    Read More
  • November 1, 2016 - Shuah Khan

    Beware of Ubuntu 16.10 Upgrade Woes

    I wanted to share a word of caution for anybody planning to update their development and test systems to Ubuntu 16.10: I can’t build kernels anymore. Ubuntu recommends a special patch to the kernel Makefile. This patch will work only on Ubuntu kernel sources and not the upstream Linux kernel trees. Linux kernel builds fail with the following message

    The message about CONFIG_CC_STACKPROTECTOR_STRONG is misleading because this Kernel config option is enabled in most distro kernels; disabling it won’t solve the kernel build failure problem. It fails because the position independent executable option is set as default in gcc version 6.2.0 20161005 (Ubuntu 6.2.0-5ubuntu12). As a result, Linux Kernel Makefile needs to update to build the kernel with “-fno-pie” option. The Ubuntu 16.10 release notes say We have modified GCC to by-default compile programs with position independent executable support to improve the security benefits provided by Address Space Layout Randomization. This may cause […]

    Read More
  • October 28, 2016 - Mauro Carvalho Chehab

    Improving Linux Kernel Development Process Documentation

    This article will cover how the Linux kernel community handled the conversion of documentation related to the kernel development process; it’s part of a series on improvements being made to Linux kernel documentation. Introduction It’s not an easy task to properly describe the Linux development process. The kernel community moves at a very fast pace and produces about 6 versions per year. Thousands of people, distributed worldwide, contribute to this collective work; the development process is a live being that constantly adjusts to what best fits the people involved in the process. Additionally, since kernel development is managed per subsystems, each maintainer has their own criteria for what works best for the subsystem they take care of. To address this, the documentation provides a common ground for understanding the best practices all kernel developers should follow. The Documentation/Development-Process Book There are several files inside the kernel that describes the development […]

    Read More