Tag / IoT.JS

  • April 20, 2018 - Phil Coval

    IoT.js landed in Raspbian

    Following previous efforts to deploy iotjs on Raspberry Pi 0, I am happy to announce that IoT.js 1.0 landed in Debian, and was sync’d to Raspbian for ArmHF and Ubuntu as well. While the package is targeting the next distro release, it can be easily installed on current versions by adding a couple of config files for “APT pinning”. If you haven’t set up Raspbian 9, just dump the current Raspbian image to SDcard (for the record I used version 2018-03-13-raspbian-stretch-lite) Boot your Pi.  To keep track of changes in /etc/, let’s install etckeeper:

    Upgrade current packages:

    Declare the current release as default source:

    Then add a repo file for the next release:

    Unless you want to test the upcoming release, it maybe be safer to avoid upgrading all packages yet.  In other words, we prefer that only iotjs should be available from this “not yet supported” […]

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  • Many web developers I meet are interested in working with embedded systems and IoT, but they always seem to have reservations on just how to make the whole system (i.e. a server, a ‘thing,’ and a client) work! The amount of information online is extensive, but it’s often hard to know where to start! This blog post will provide a very simple example of how to get a basic LED light to work in a local network, with a web client that provides a way to identify the light with no prior knowledge from the user and no required installation on the client device. To do this we are going to use a very popular Python Django web framework and the  Samsungs IoT.JS framework. This post will provide an overview, basic code snippets, and links to more information on the GitHub repo. I’ll also provide exact links to the hardware […]

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  • March 15, 2018 - Ziran Sun

    An Introduction to IoT.js Architecture

    IoT.js is a lightweight JavaScript platform for the Internet of Things. The platform keeps interoperable services at the forefront, and is designed to bring the success of Node.js to IoT devices like micro-controllers and other devices that are constrained to limited storage and only a few kilobytes of RAM. IoT.js is built on top of JerryScript: a lightweight JavaScript interpreter, and libtuv: an event driven (non-blocking I/O model) library. The project is open source under the Apache 2.0 license. This article will introduce you to the architecture of IoT.js and the fundamentals of writing applications for it. IoT.js Architecture JerryScript – ECMAScript binding JerryScript is the kernel for IoT.js on an ECMAScript binding, it’s an ultra lightweight JavaScript engine that was written from scratch at Samsung. The name “Jerry” comes from the popular character in Tom and Jerry, who’s small, smart, and fast! Since the engine is an interpreter only, it might be more […]

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  • March 13, 2018 - Phil Coval

    How to Run IoT.js on the Raspberry PI 0

    IoT.js is a lightweight JavaScript platform for building Internet of Things devices; this article will show you how to run it on a few dollars worth of hardware. The First version of it was released last year for various platforms including Linux, Tizen, and NuttX (the base of Tizen:RT). The Raspberry Pi 2 is one of the reference targets, but for demo purposes we also tried to build for the Raspberry Pi Zero, which is the most limited and cheapest device of the family. The main difference is the CPU architecture, which is ARMv6 (like the Pi 1), while the Pi 2 is ARMv7, and the Pi 3 is ARMv8 (aka ARM64). IoT.js upstream uses a python helper script to crossbuild for supported devices, but instead of adding support to new device I tried to build on the device using native tools with cmake and the default compiler options; it […]

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  • OSCON is one of the leading conferences in the open source world, and it attracts thousands of visitors every year to Portland, OR. This year’s event wrapped up on Friday, July 24, and the Samsung Open Source Group sent about a dozen representatives to the conference this year to present talks, interact with visitors, and staff a large booth that featured demos of a handful of the open source projects we are involved with. We’re still a pretty small group here at Samsung with less than 50 people scattered throughout the world, so it’s important to us that we raise awareness about the work we do and OSCON is a good opportunity for us to do so. Scratching Our Itches In true open source fashion, Samsung went to OSCON in order to scratch the company’s own itches. In other words, like most companies and organizations, we were there to help […]

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