Tag / IoT

  • The Tizen Developer Conference (TDC) is just around the corner; it will be held May 16 – 17 at the Hilton Union Square Hotel in San Francisco, CA. Our team contributes a ton of code to some of the critical open source software that makes up Tizen, so of course we’ll be spending some time there to network with app developers and device makers who work with Tizen. What’s Happening with Tizen? There has been quite a few exciting developments for Tizen over the last year; for starters Samsung joined forces with Microsoft to bring .NET to Tizen, allowing developers to build applications for Tizen using C# and Visual Studio. Additionally, Tizen has continued to show up on a growing number of consumer devices including the Gear S3, Z2,  Gear 360, AR9500M air conditioner, POWERbot VR7000, multiple smart TV’s, and more. Finally, Tizen RT was released last year, making it […]

    Read More
  • December 29, 2016 - Arun Raghavan

    Playback Synchronization & Video Walls with GStreamer

    Hello again, and I hope you’re having a pleasant end of the year (if you are, you might want to consider avoiding the news until next year). In a previous post, I wrote about synchronized playback with GStreamer, and work on this has continued apace. Since I last wrote about it, a bunch of work has been completed: Added support for sending a playlist to clients (instead of a single URI), Added the ability to start/stop playback, Cleaned up the API considerably to improve the potential for it to be included upstream, Turned the control protocol implementation into an interface to remove the necessity to use the built-in TCP server (different use-cases might want different transports), Improved overall robustness of code and documentation, Introduced an API for clients to send the server information about themselves, and finally Added an API for the server to send video transformations for each specific client to apply before rendering. […]

    Read More
  • August 3, 2016 - Phil Coval

    How to Boot Tizen on ARTIK

    The fact that Tizen can be run on ARTIK is not the latest breaking news, considering it was previously demonstrated live at the 2015 Tizen Conference. There, the ARTIK project was also explained as an IoT platform of choice. Since then, ARTIK has become a new Tizen reference device, so here are a couple of hints that will help you test upcoming Tizen release on this hardware. First let me point out that Tizen’s wiki has a special ARTIK category, where you’ll find ongoing documentation efforts, you’ll want to bookmark this page. In this article, I will provide a deeper explanation of how to use the bleeding edge version of Tizen:3.0:Common on ARTIK10, and how to start working on this platform. As explained in my previous Yocto/meta-artik article, I suggest you avoid using the eMMC for development purposes; for this article I will boot the ARTIK from an SDcard. In […]

    Read More
  • June 13, 2016 - Phil Coval and Mats Wichmann

    How to Run IoTivity on ARTIK with Yocto

    Samsung ARTIK is described by its developers as an end-to-end, integrated IoT platform that transforms the process of building, launching, and managing IoT products. I first saw one a year ago at the Samsung VIPEvent 2015 in Paris, but now there is an ARTIK10 on my desk and I would like to share some of my experiences of it with you. In this post, I will show how to build a whole GNU/Linux system using Yocto, a project that provides great flexibility in mixing and matching components and customizing an environment to support new hardware or interesting software like IoTivity. If you’re looking for Tizen support, it’s already here (check at bottom of this article), but this post will focus on a generic Linux build. Many of the board’s features I will be covering in this article are briefly introduced in the following video: https://youtu.be/7ZUYF21d1zo?#iotivity-artik-20160505rzr.mp4 There are 3 ARTIK models […]

    Read More
  • There are many companies shipping products based on ARMv8 today, including AMD, Samsung, NVIDIA, Cavium, Apple, Broadcom, Qualcomm, Huawei, and others.  What makes ARM unique is the differentiation between vendors; while a majority of features are based on the ARM reference processor and bus architectures, additional custom features may be introduced or reference features may be omitted at the vendor’s discretion. This results in various profiles that are tailored to specific products, making it extremely difficult for another architecture to compete against such a wide selection of choices. As ARMv8 matures, it’s moving out of mobile and embedded devices into Industrial IoT (Internet of Things), network routers, wireless infrastructure, and eventually, the cloud. For those of you not familiar with KVM, it stands for Kernel Virtual Machine. It’s a Linux Kernel hypervisor module. KVM is the primary open-source-based hypervisor, and is the default for Openstack, a popular cloud computing software […]

    Read More