Tag / Kernel

  • This article is a part of a series that covers improvements that are being made to the Linux Kernel documentation; this article will begin to explain how we handled the conversion of the Linux Media subsystem documentation. The Linux Media Subsystem The Linux Media subsystem is actually a set of subsystems; each subsystem has its own particularities: Video4Linux –  API and core provide functions for video stream capture and output. It also provides support for video codecs, analog TV, AM/FM radio receivers and transmitters and for software digital radio (SDR) receivers and transmitters. Linux DVB – provides support for digital TV. Despite its name, it supports worldwide standards, including DVB, ATSC, ISDB, and CDDB, as well remote controllers and infra-red devices. Media Controller – provides pipeline control and reconfiguration inside the hardware. HDMI CEC – provides support for the HDMI Consumers Electronic Control (CEC): a system to pass remote controller […]

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  • This article is the first in a series on improvements to Linux Kernel documentation. The Linux Kernel has one of the biggest communities in the open source world; the numbers are impressive: over 4,000 contributors per year, resulting in about 8 changes per hour. That results in 4,600 lines of code added every day and a major release every 9-10 weeks. With these impressive numbers, it’s impossible for a traditional printed book to follow the changes because by the time the book is finally written, reviewed and published, a lot of changes have already merged upstream. So, the best way to maintain updated documentation is to keep it close to the source code. This way, when some changes happen, the developer that wrote such changes can also update the corresponding documents. That works great in theory, but it is not as effective as one might think. The Old Methods of […]

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  • Open source communities can be vast, have an extremely fast rate of development, and have numerous companies and individuals who influence the project’s direction. Because of this diversity and speed it can be very easy for a company’s contributions to be lost in the shuffle, and it’s vital for any company that wants to contribute significant code upstream to establish themselves within the community. We’ve worked hard to establish a strong open source engineering team here at Samsung, and we’ve learned a lot about what it takes to be successful at this along the way. Without further ado, here are 10 tips to help you improve your company’s success at contributing code to the an open source community. Hire key developers and maintainers from the community. This is a critical step that allows you to gain skills and expertise. Two or three people from any given project are enough to […]

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  • I recently installed Ubuntu 15.10 on Odroid-XU4 and set out to run the upstream kernel on it. After several trials and errors and being forced to reference various forums, I now have Odroid running the Linux 4.6 Kernel. In this article, I will share how to quickly get from unboxing to running the latest kernel with a short detour to upgrade to the Ubuntu 16.04 release. Without further ado, let’s get started. First of all, download the Ubuntu 15.10 image. You can find the release notes and self installing image here: Release notes for Ubuntu 15.10 (v1.0) ubuntu-15.10-mate-odroid-xu3-20160114.img.xz Prepare the microSD Card Once you’ve downloaded the image from the 2nd link above, follow the following steps to create a bootable microSD card with the image; I used a 32 GB Samsung microSD card. Insert the microSD card in its SD card adapter case in the SD card slot on your host PC or […]

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  • November 23, 2015 - Javier Martinez Canillas

    Samsung OSG Contributions to the Linux Kernel 4.3

    Linux 4.3 was released two weeks ago; 5 engineers from the Samsung Open Source Group (OSG) contributed 168 patches that modified 4002 lines of code in a handful of kernel subsystems. The following list is all of the OSG engineers that contributed to this release and the number of changesets and lines of code as reported by Jonathan Corbet and Greg Kroah-Hartman’s gitdm tool. OSG developers by changesets Javier Martinez Canillas 65 38.7% Mauro Carvalho Chehab 56 33.3% Luis de Bethencourt 44 26.2% Mario Smarduch 2 1.2% Stefan Schmidt 1 0.6% OSG developers by changed lines Mauro Carvalho Chehab 1823 45.6% Javier Martinez Canillas 1746 43.6% Luis de Bethencourt 345 8.6% Mario Smarduch 76 1.9% Stefan Schmidt 12 0.3% Mauro worked on cleanups and bugfixing in the media subsystem and considerably improved the media DocBook. Javier worked on cleanups and bugfixing in ARM Exynos support and fixed module autoloading for […]

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