Tag / kselftest

  • In the upcoming Linux 4.14-rc3 release, work continues to develop the Kselftest TAP13 framework API and convert tests to TAP13. The new tests include Kselftest common RUN_TESTS in lib.mk that have been enhanced to print TAP13 to cover test shell scripts that won’t be able to use the Kselftest TAP13 API; this also covers test programs that aren’t converted yet. Several fixes have been made to existing tests to prevent failure in unsupported cases as part of an ongoing work based on feedback from Kselftest stable release users that don’t want the tests to fail due to unmet dependencies, such as config options being disabled. Additionally, a new watchdog test has been added and much needed cleanups to the existing watchdog tests have been made by Eugeniu Rosca. A New Kselftest Use-Case A notable change in this release is new support for the “make O=dir kselftest” use-case.  Several developers rely on this […]

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  • July 28, 2017 - Shuah Khan

    Kselftest for Linux 4.13 to Include TAP13

    Linux 4.13-rc1 was released on July 15th 2017  and it includes enhancements to the Kselftest framework to support The Test Anything Protocol v13 (TAP13). TAP13 defines a human friendly output format for tests. Kselftest is run in test rings and is widely used for Linux kernel stable release regression testing. It’s important to make it easier to identify run-to-run differences; TAP13 adaption makes it easier to understand the test results, and helps pin point differences between one run to another run of the test suite. Credit goes to Tim Bird for recommending TAP13 as a suitable format, and to Greg KH for kick starting the work with help from Paul Elder and Alice Ferrazzi. The first phase of the TAP13 conversion is included in Linux 4.13. Future releases will include updates to rest of the tests. The following shows membarrier test results before and after TAP 13 conversion: Before:

    After: […]

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  • The Linux kernel contains a set of developer unit and regression tests (Kselftests) under tools/testing/selftests; these tests exercise individual code paths in the kernel. In this blog post, I’ll explain how to build and run these tests, run Kselftest on a system it’s built on, and how to install and run tests on a target test system. Even though kselftest’s main purpose is for developer regression test, testers and users can also use it to ensure there are no regressions in a new kernel. Kselftest is run everyday on several Linux kernel trees on the 0-Day and kernelci.org Linux kernel integration test rings. How to Build Kselftest The tests are intended to be run after building, installing, and booting a kernel.

    Boot the new kernel, then execute the following

    Please note, some tests require root privileges. You can run a subset of selftests using “TARGETS” make command […]

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