Tag / OCF

  • April 7, 2017 - Phil Coval and Sanjeev BA

    How OCF is Creating the Connected Car

    The Connected Car & Fragmentation Traditional car manufacturers have begun including early iterations of touchscreen technology with access to media and apps that can also provide basic HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and A/C) controls for the vehicle. These features can often be accessed through mobile devices with tailor-made apps from each car maker. However, this has led to OEMs building their own ecosystem silos, similar to the trends observed in the smartphone industry. The lack of an open, standardized framework has resulted in a fragmented market, where experiences from one OEM won’t work with another in any streamlined way; consequently, developers aren’t thinking about how to provide a rich user experience that allows cars and drivers to work in unison; this is a huge missed opportunity. Samsung OSG, OCF, and IoTivity The Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) is creating a specification and sponsoring the IoTivity open source project to deliver an open and secure connectivity and […]

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  • A curious mind recently asked me to share materials about the OCF SmartHome demo, or perhaps I should call it the “Minimalist Smart Switch” instead. The demo was displayed at the Embedded Linux Conference in Berlin, and featured IoTivity running on an ARTIK10 SoC that connected to a Tizen Gear S2 Smartwatch; both run Tizen OS. You will find more technical details in the following slide deck. IoTivity Tutorial: Prototyping IoT Devices on GNU/Linux from Samsung Open Source Group Install Tizen and IoTivity If you want to run it this demo, you can download the system image and uncompress the archive directly to the SD card using QEMU tools.

    Once this is completed, insert the SD card into the ARTIK10 and turn it on; it will boot Tizen and launch the IoTivity server. For more information about this, check out the previous blog posts about booting tizen on ARTIK and […]

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  • May 17, 2016 - Sanjeev BA and Phil Coval

    OSG, OCF, & An Automotive Fortnight!

    The Samsung Open Source Group is playing an active role in the promotion and adoption of IoT standards across multiple domains. Samsung understands the importance of openness and collaboration to realize the full potential of IoT. One of the key promises we’ve made,  is to be open and collaborative in our approach to delivering products and solutions to our customers. This was a core part of the Samsung strategy, as explained in the following video. Samsung has remain committed to this approach and continued to deliver on the promise, year after year. Based on these principles the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), a global consortium of leading companies (~170 and growing) focused on creating a standard for interoperable devices and services was founded in 2014. The OCF approach has three key deliverables: An Open Specification: Open Connectivity Foundation An Open Source Implementation: IoTivity A membership driven certification program:  OCF certification Through this approach, OCF has created […]

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  • November 12, 2015 - Habib Virji

    The Layered Architecture of IoTivity

    This article is part 2 of a 4 part series on how IoTivity handles security for the connected IoT world. IoTivity is an implementation of the OIC standard. In part one of this series, I covered the how the client and server model is used to establish connectivity. The server hosts resources and the client finds and controls resources. Each resource is represented by a type that is standardized by the OIC and includes details such as addresses and access control policies. IoTivity has a layered architecture where each layer performs different functionality. This article will cover each of these layers. Multi-Bearer Support IoTivity supports Bluetooth Low Energy using GATT, Bluetooth EDR (Enhanced Data Rate) using RFCOMM, Dual IPv4/v6 stack, and XMPP (remote access connectivity). All of the details for each of these bearers is hidden in the connectivity abstraction layer. The IoTivity stack has support for these bearers built in by […]

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