Tag / Strategy

  • March 27, 2017 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    The Technical Value of Open Source Software

    This article is part of The Comprehensive Guide to Open Source for Business. Technical value is one of the most important traits of software development and engineering. A mature open source community will often have multiple companies, organizations, and individuals who contribute to and depend on the code base. Any groups that depend on the code are invested in the future of the code, making it much less likely for the code to disappear while simultaneously encouraging participants to play an active role in ensuring proper bug and security fixing processes. This article will explore the ways open source software can benefit a business from a technical perspective by offering improved code stability and greater control over the software stack. Open Source Improves Code Stability Software built by a proprietary component provider can typically only be fixed by employees of the vendor company. In an open source community, anyone can test or fix […]

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  • Consistency is everything. If launching open source projects is part of your job, it is incredibly helpful to have a clear, consistent, and repeatable process for open sourcing code and building a project. Why? There are a few reasons. For one, it increases your odds of success if you can identify the parts of the process that worked well before, and repeat them. Project launches are about people as much as technology. There are actions that attract others, and actions that drive others away; it’s beneficial to remember which is which. If you can’t convince others to join and use your project, you may as well just post the code and be done with it. Another major reason is time. I seriously doubt I’m alone in observing that the typical “We’re launching an OSS project next month! Um, where do we start?” emails usually come with little warning. Most of the time […]

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  • We’re approaching (in a few months) the 24th anniversary of the famous email that Linus Torvalds (then an anonymous college student) sent to the world announcing his ‘hobby’ operating system (Linux). A lot has changed since that email, and while Linus still maintains ultimate veto power over what goes into the Linux Kernel, the fundamental tenet of letting go of a portion of the control over his project to gain the advantages of mass collaboration remains. This is at the core of all open source projects, and even in 2015 it seems to be a lesson that some people in Corporate America still haven’t fully grasped. The good news is that pretty much every industry has recognized the huge value of consuming open source, whether it be for internal use in their enterprise infrastructure, or as the basis for successful product lines. However, there is still widespread corporate reluctance to […]

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