Tag / Tizen

  • April 7, 2017 - Phil Coval and Sanjeev BA

    How OCF is Creating the Connected Car

    The Connected Car & Fragmentation Traditional car manufacturers have begun including early iterations of touchscreen technology with access to media and apps that can also provide basic HVAC (Heating, Ventilation and A/C) controls for the vehicle. These features can often be accessed through mobile devices with tailor-made apps from each car maker. However, this has led to OEMs building their own ecosystem silos, similar to the trends observed in the smartphone industry. The lack of an open, standardized framework has resulted in a fragmented market, where experiences from one OEM won’t work with another in any streamlined way; consequently, developers aren’t thinking about how to provide a rich user experience that allows cars and drivers to work in unison; this is a huge missed opportunity. Samsung OSG, OCF, and IoTivity The Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF) is creating a specification and sponsoring the IoTivity open source project to deliver an open and secure connectivity and […]

    Read More
  • A curious mind recently asked me to share materials about the OCF SmartHome demo, or perhaps I should call it the “Minimalist Smart Switch” instead. The demo was displayed at the Embedded Linux Conference in Berlin, and featured IoTivity running on an ARTIK10 SoC that connected to a Tizen Gear S2 Smartwatch; both run Tizen OS. You will find more technical details in the following slide deck. IoTivity Tutorial: Prototyping IoT Devices on GNU/Linux from Samsung Open Source Group Install Tizen and IoTivity If you want to run it this demo, you can download the system image and uncompress the archive directly to the SD card using QEMU tools.

    Once this is completed, insert the SD card into the ARTIK10 and turn it on; it will boot Tizen and launch the IoTivity server. For more information about this, check out the previous blog posts about booting tizen on ARTIK and […]

    Read More
  • November 4, 2016 - Chris Michael

    Ecore_Wl2: An EFL Library for Wayland Applications

    Throughout the years of developing Wayland support for EFL, few EFL libraries have had as much impact on EFL Wayland applications as the Ecore_Wayland library has. This library was one of the first to make it possible to truly run EFL applications in a Wayland environment. As the years progressed, it became apparent that Ecore_Wayland had some shortcomings; this blog post will introduce you to the replacement for Ecore_Wayland, called Ecore_Wl2. Ecore_Wayland’s Shortcomings While testing our first Wayland implementation, it became apparent that the initial implementation of the Ecore_Wayland library had some drawbacks. Publicly exposed structures could not be changed easily without breaking existing applications, and any changes to existing Wayland protocols would require significant changes to our Ecore_Wayland library. It was also discovered that when an EFL Wayland application creates a new window, the backend library also creates an entirely new display and connection to the Wayland server. This […]

    Read More
  • October 26, 2016 - Chris Michael

    Ecore_Drm2: How to Use Atomic Modesetting

    In a previous article, I briefly discussed how the Ecore_Drm2 library came into being. This article will expand on that article and provide a brief introduction to the Atomic Modesetting and Nuclear Pageflip features inside the new Ecore_Drm2 library. What Makes Atomic Modesetting and Nuclear Pageflip so Great? For those that are unaware of what “modesetting” is, you may read more about it here. Atomic Modesetting is a feature that allows for output modes (resolutions, refresh rate, etc) to be tested in advance on a single screen or on multiple outputs. A benefit of this feature is that the given mode may be tested prior to being applied. If the test of a given output mode fails, the screen image doesn’t need to be changed to confirm a given mode works or not, thus reducing screen flickering. Atomic/Nuclear Pageflipping allows for a given scanout framebuffer object and/or one or more hardware […]

    Read More
  • August 15, 2016 - Phil Coval

    An Introduction to Tizen Development on ARTIK

    This article is a direct follow up of my previous post about booting Tizen on the ARTIK10. Before starting, you should bookmark this wiki page as an entry point for Tizen on ARTIK devices. At the 2015 Tizen Developer Conference, I had the opportunity to present a tutorial about Tizen platform development; it’s still valid today. This article is very similar but is adapted for ARTIK10 and ARTIK5 configuration. For some context, check out to the following slide deck along with the recorded video on how to patch Tizen and build with GBS for x86a as well as this page about Tizen:Common on VMware. tdc2015-strategy-devel-20150916 from Phil C Tools Setup If you’re familiar with Tizen you probably know about Git Build System (GBS): a very convenient tool to build packages. It’s adapted from Debian’s git-build-package to support zypper repos. First, gbs and some other Tizen tools need to be installed […]

    Read More
  • August 3, 2016 - Phil Coval

    How to Boot Tizen on ARTIK

    The fact that Tizen can be run on ARTIK is not the latest breaking news, considering it was previously demonstrated live at the 2015 Tizen Conference. There, the ARTIK project was also explained as an IoT platform of choice. Since then, ARTIK has become a new Tizen reference device, so here are a couple of hints that will help you test upcoming Tizen release on this hardware. First let me point out that Tizen’s wiki has a special ARTIK category, where you’ll find ongoing documentation efforts, you’ll want to bookmark this page. In this article, I will provide a deeper explanation of how to use the bleeding edge version of Tizen:3.0:Common on ARTIK10, and how to start working on this platform. As explained in my previous Yocto/meta-artik article, I suggest you avoid using the eMMC for development purposes; for this article I will boot the ARTIK from an SDcard. In […]

    Read More
  • June 15, 2016 - Chris Michael

    Elput: A Libinput Abstraction for EFL

    Input is something generally taken for granted, but it’s not without issues. While working on a new EFL library for Direct Rendering, the community decided that having the same libinput code duplicated across multiple internal subsystems like Ecore_Fb, Ecore_Drm, etc. would be a great effort to maintain in the future. To reduce this effort, Elput was created. Introducing Elput Elput is a library designed to abstract all the gory details of using libinput, and it provides a central API that can be used to initialize, iterate, and manipulate various input devices found on a system. These can include keyboards, pointers, touch screens, and any other input device that libinput supports. Elput is also multi-seat aware, meaning that when a new input device gets attached to the system and belongs to a different seat, Elput will automatically create a new seat internally and do any setup required for that new input […]

    Read More
  • June 13, 2016 - Phil Coval and Mats Wichmann

    How to Run IoTivity on ARTIK with Yocto

    Samsung ARTIK is described by its developers as an end-to-end, integrated IoT platform that transforms the process of building, launching, and managing IoT products. I first saw one a year ago at the Samsung VIPEvent 2015 in Paris, but now there is an ARTIK10 on my desk and I would like to share some of my experiences of it with you. In this post, I will show how to build a whole GNU/Linux system using Yocto, a project that provides great flexibility in mixing and matching components and customizing an environment to support new hardware or interesting software like IoTivity. If you’re looking for Tizen support, it’s already here (check at bottom of this article), but this post will focus on a generic Linux build. Many of the board’s features I will be covering in this article are briefly introduced in the following video: https://youtu.be/7ZUYF21d1zo?#iotivity-artik-20160505rzr.mp4 There are 3 ARTIK models […]

    Read More
  • May 17, 2016 - Sanjeev BA and Phil Coval

    OSG, OCF, & An Automotive Fortnight!

    The Samsung Open Source Group is playing an active role in the promotion and adoption of IoT standards across multiple domains. Samsung understands the importance of openness and collaboration to realize the full potential of IoT. One of the key promises we’ve made,  is to be open and collaborative in our approach to delivering products and solutions to our customers. This was a core part of the Samsung strategy, as explained in the following video. Samsung has remain committed to this approach and continued to deliver on the promise, year after year. Based on these principles the Open Connectivity Foundation (OCF), a global consortium of leading companies (~170 and growing) focused on creating a standard for interoperable devices and services was founded in 2014. The OCF approach has three key deliverables: An Open Specification: Open Connectivity Foundation An Open Source Implementation: IoTivity A membership driven certification program:  OCF certification Through this approach, OCF has created […]

    Read More
  • Tizen+RPI2

    September 14, 2015 - Mauro Carvalho Chehab

    Setup WiFi on Your Raspberry Pi 2 with Tizen

    Once you have your RPi2 up and running with Tizen, it is helpful to get network connectivity setup. This article is part of our series about Tizen on the Raspberry Pi 2, and this guide will describe how to enable WiFi on your RPi2. Doing this will make it much easier to work on the device because it will allow you to connect using ssh through your wireless network and access remote resources on the Internet. Get Familiar With the Hardware The procedure to enable WiFi on Tizen for Raspberry PI2 (Rpi2) is simple. You will first want to make sure Tizen detects your WiFi adapter. You can find it by running lsusb which will display all connected usb devices, including . My own RPi2  is using a Realtek device based on the RTL 8188CUS chipset:

    Once connected, it produces the following messages:

    You can use view this […]

    Read More