Tag / Tutorial

  • As you might already know, many open source projects are moving away from autotools as a build system and are embracing Meson. GStreamer was one of the first projects to initiate this move as the community pushed for it to happen. Meson has many advantages over autotools, but one I would like to talk about in this post is the notion of subprojects, which Meson introduces. Basically, thanks to this it’s easy to build several projects as if it was one; GStreamer has many components that were formerly independent in the build system, meaning that if you wanted to build the latest version of, say, gst-plugins-bad, you also needed to build GStreamer core and GStreamer base one way or another. Previously, we had some scripts to help with this process, but it was still necessary to clone and build everything separately and handle interdependency between things manually. Today, things are different when using […]

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  • October 27, 2016 - Bryce Harrington

    The Basics of Input Methods in Weston

    Wayland provides an optional protocol, zwp_input_method, for defining alternate ways of sending keystrokes and mouse activity to clients. This could be things such as an onscreen keyboard or a popup for building Korean characters. The design of the protocol allows for different kinds of input methods to be made available via modular plugins, allowing them to be coded as discrete client applications, separate from the compositor’s core. The Wayland project maintains a reference compositor named Weston that provides implementations of the various protocols for demonstrative purposes, including two implementations of the zwp_input_method protocol. One input method, weston-keyboard, manages an on-screen keyboard that pops up at the bottom of the screen, similar to on-screen keyboards typically seen on touch-based mobile devices. The other input method, weston-simple-im, enables a compose key functionality. The user can configure which input method to use via their weston.ini file. No more than one input method can […]

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  • August 30, 2016 - Mike Blumenkrantz

    Enlightenment Gadget Lifetime Management & Site Creation

    This article is part of a series of tutorials about Enlightenment: a compositing and stacking window manager. The previous tutorials covered the basics of gadgets, this article will explore some of the more complex aspects in more detail, specifically lifetime management and gadget site creation. Gadget Lifetime Management Gadgets are bound by two lifetimes: the gadget object’s lifetime, and the gadget instance lifetime. The gadget object is the visible display for a gadget and it is deleted when either the site is deleted, when the gadget instance is deleted, or when the gadget’s orientation changes. This lifetime can be tracked using the EVAS_CALLBACK_DEL callback on the created object. At the time of calling, this indicates that any memory related to the gadget object should be cleaned up, and any non-Elementary sub-objects should be deleted; the toolkit will not delete these automatically and they will leak without manual deletion. Once this […]

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  • June 13, 2016 - Phil Coval and Mats Wichmann

    How to Run IoTivity on ARTIK with Yocto

    Samsung ARTIK is described by its developers as an end-to-end, integrated IoT platform that transforms the process of building, launching, and managing IoT products. I first saw one a year ago at the Samsung VIPEvent 2015 in Paris, but now there is an ARTIK10 on my desk and I would like to share some of my experiences of it with you. In this post, I will show how to build a whole GNU/Linux system using Yocto, a project that provides great flexibility in mixing and matching components and customizing an environment to support new hardware or interesting software like IoTivity. If you’re looking for Tizen support, it’s already here (check at bottom of this article), but this post will focus on a generic Linux build. Many of the board’s features I will be covering in this article are briefly introduced in the following video: https://youtu.be/7ZUYF21d1zo?#iotivity-artik-20160505rzr.mp4 There are 3 ARTIK models […]

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  • May 18, 2015 - Ben Lloyd Pearson

    Get Started With Tizen Development On Linux Mint 17

    Tizen is a great platform to develop apps for if you are someone who comes from a web development background. The ability to write apps for wearable devices and smartphones using nothing more than HTML/CSS and JavaScript makes building simple applications a breeze. Tizen extends the functionality of these languages by giving them access to all of the sensors found in many wearable devices and smartphones, which allows developers to build unique apps using simple languages. This guide is tested on Linux Mint 17, and most of it should also work for Ubuntu. Note: Any red text in this guide might be different based on your own configurations or the software versions you download. Prerequisites You will need to download two things before you start. The installer for the latest version of the Tizen SDK for Ubuntu (2.3 at the time of this article) The latest version of the Oracle […]

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